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The neoliberal policy response to the crisis in Ghana did not succeed in reversing the economic decline in both the medium and long term. In fact, quite the opposite, rather than undoing the economic decline, Frimpong argues that the policy prescriptions further weakened the country’s ability to develop. This is because the policies intentionally and unintentionally encouraged factors that destabilised the possibility of the real productive assets to earn commensurate returns to facilitate the flow of capital to the real sectors to ensure the survival of industrial enterprises. Rising profit in the financial sector incentivised financial capitalist to divert capital into financial assets at the expense of productive investment, further decelerating the pace of real capital accumulation in the country.
Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.
Volume Editor: Ulf Engel
This is the first edition of the Yearbook on the African Union. It is first and foremost an academic project that will provide an in-depth evaluation and analysis of the institution, its processes, and its engagements. Despite the increased agency in recent years of the African Union in general, and the AU Commission in particular, little is known – outside expert policy or niche academic circles – about the Union’s activities. This is the gap the Yearbook on the African Union wants to systematically bridge. It seeks to be a reference point for in-depth research, evidence-based policy-making and decision-making.

Contributors are: Adekeye Adebajo, Habibu Yaya Bappah, Bruce Byiers, Annie Barbara Hazviyemurwi Chikwanha, Dawit Yohannes Wondemagegnehu, Katharina P.W. Döring, Jens Herpolsheimer, Jacob Lisakafu, Frank Mattheis, Henning Melber, Alphonse Muleefu, John N. Nkengasong, Edefe Ojomo, Awino Okech, Jamie Pring, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, Tim Zajontz.
African History seeks to publish scholarly writing on the history of Africa. It welcomes submissions on the history of any part of the continent and its islands. Works could range from the earliest epochs through to the recent past. Particularly welcome are studies that bring to light new archival materials, offer new interpretations of established sources or arguments, and that are interdisciplinary in method but historically-grounded.

We are keen to have the publications in this series widely available on the African continent and therefore pursue co-publishing arrangements with local publishers.


Abstract

The article argues that there are three senses of the term African diaspora – a continental, a cultural and a racial sense – which need to be distinguished from each other when conceptualising Black African diasporas in Europe. Although African Diaspora Studies is occupied with African diasporas in a racial sense, usually it has conceptualised these in terms of racial and cultural identities. This is also true of the past decades of African Diaspora Studies on Europe. This article makes an argument for a socio-political conceptualisation of Black African diasporas in Europe that includes, but goes beyond, matters of identity and culture.

In: African Diaspora

Abstract

Non-formal apprenticeship opportunities have a clear record of effectiveness, as evidenced by several research studies. After completing short-term vocational training, apprentices demonstrate the required vocational skills. How is learning constructed in a non-formal learning process? What forms of interaction are developed? What are the determinants of the effectiveness demonstrated by apprentices?

This article answers these questions by analysing data from a survey that evaluates the elements of the training context and the level of skills acquired by apprentices. It shows that there is great flexibility in the organisation and techniques of learning, as well as permanent interdependence between apprentices, which facilitates the co-construction of skills.

In: Afrika Focus

Abstract

Several programmes by government and non-governmental organisations aimed at improving maternal health in many sub-Saharan African nations have not achieved significant results. Use of traditional maternal care services has been identified as still prevalent and thus a possible factor. This study investigated determinants of use of traditional birth services (tbs s) among patrons in tbs-inclined communities of Nigeria and Ghana. A total of 180 and 160 patrons of tbs s were selected from the respective countries, using a multi-stage procedure. The most utilised tbs s include home delivery, concoctions/herbs and family planning. Educational level, constraints to using conventional services, income, and perceived social and economic advantages significantly influenced utilisation. Patrons in Nigeria had better perceived relative advantages of tbs than Ghana, while the accessibility of conventional maternal services, performance rating and overall utilisation of tbs s did not differ significantly between the two countries. Social bonds and economic status were the main reasons for continued patronage of tbs s.

In: Afrika Focus

Abstract

Mauritius won its first victory when the “tribunal constituted under Annex vii of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea” delivered its award “in the matter of the Chagos Marine Protected Area (mpa) Arbitration, between the Republic of Mauritius and the United Kingdom”. The award declared that the mpa established around Chagos by the United Kingdom was against international law. However, the decision desired by both Mauritius and the Chagossians is found in the dissenting opinion, which is, as a matter of law, non-binding. The dissenting opinion is to the effect that the tribunal had jurisdiction to consider the issue of sovereignty over Chagos and that if such issue was considered, Mauritius had a strong case for winning back sovereignty over Chagos. This article aims to make the dissenting opinions more widely known and reflect on the legal value of such opinions, alongside their high political and moral value and relevance to Mauritius and the Chagossians.

In: Afrika Focus
In: Afrika Focus

Abstract

The financial sustainability of microfinance institutions (mfi s) is crucial if their benefits are to be enjoyed in the long run. This study investigated the determinants of mfi s’ financial sustainability at growth stage. The study aimed to address the following questions: are factors influencing financial sustainability at maturity equally important at growth stage? What influence do lending terms have on financial sustainability at growth stage? The study used panel regression models and four-year survey data from 106 rural mfi s in Tanzania. Decomposition of lending types was adopted to unveil the contribution of lending terms to financial sustainability. We found that most factors influencing financial sustainability at maturity stage are equally important in influencing sustainability at growth stage. In addition, two factors appear to affect financial sustainability at growth stage only. Moreover, lending terms matter in determining financial sustainability at growth stage. The study provides insights on how lending terms can be used to influence financial sustainability at growth stage.

In: Afrika Focus