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The book offers studies on different aspects of the life, activity, and written works of Roberto da Lecce, one of the most famous preachers of fifteenth-century Italy. His preaching cycles in Italian cities were attended by huge crowds and are representative for the activity of many other less-known confreres and, in the meantime, exceptional for their number and success. His sermons were read and re-used throughout Europe, contributing to shaping the shared religious culture. The nine authors of this book have addressed this polyhedric figure from ten different perspectives.
Contributors are Yoko Kimura, Salvatore Leaci, Andrea Radošević, Cecilia Rado, Carolyn Muessig, Giacomo Mariani, Marco Maggiore, Lyn Blanchfield, and Steven J McMichael.
Author:
In a decade, Francis has transformed Catholicism into a dynamic institution that openly deliberates on urgent questions of society and religion, standing at the forefront of digitally driven public opinion. With this in mind, Portrayals of Pope Francis’s Authority in the Digital Age: Flicks and Media Discourses, and User Perspectives explores the digital portraits of Pope Francis in various types of media content and productions. It investigates how digital Catholic users articulate and negotiate papal authority and through which media they do so.
Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 34 takes an intersectional approach to the study of religious and non-religious belief, in different geographical contexts, using a variety of methods and always privileging the layered identities of those who 'live' religion and non-religion in their daily lives. The Open Section includes articles on topics of everyday significance such as experiences of Zakat in Qatar, Muslim marriages in Britain and Indian migrants living in Indonesia. The Special Section (A Sociology of Religion or Belief in South Asia) includes articles that interrogate the politics of religious identity in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Throughout, this volume demonstrates how experiences of belief are shaped by local and historical contexts, in addition to theology.
Authors: and

Abstract

The article aims to examine religious activity in Christian churches. In order to achieve this goal, religious activity is defined through religious practices such as church attendance, prayer, and Bible reading. The data used in the article are taken from a survey of growing churches (hereafter referred to as KK2020, n=350), in which nine Estonian growing churches participated. The main comparative base is the sociological survey on religion “On Life, Faith and Religious Life” (EUU2020, n=1000), conducted in Estonia. As a result of the analysis, the article presents an overview of religious activity indicators for growing churches, ordinary churches, and the adult Estonian population and compares growing churches of different denominations. Based on the results, it can be hypothesized that religious activity of church members and minister has positive influence on church growth.

In: Journal of Empirical Theology

Abstract

This article investigates the formation of meaningful pastoral care relationships by chaplains with older people with dementia in nursing homes. The study responds to the recently highlighted need for theological exploration of wellbeing by providing a theological analysis of how a meaningful pastoral care relationship is formed from chaplains’ perspectives. The study employs thematic analysis of ten interviews to uncover core themes. These include the embodied aspects of pastoral care, which highlight the non-verbal dimensions of pastoral care; emotional support, emphasizing the chaplains’ role in providing comfort and empathy; interpersonal relations, detailing the dynamics between chaplains, older people with severe dementia, and the care environment; and supporting the personal relationship with God, underscoring the individual’s religious and spiritual connections. This research contributes to understanding how theological considerations inform pastoral care practices, offering insights into the nuanced religious and spiritual needs of older adults with dementia within a nursing home setting.

Open Access
In: Journal of Empirical Theology

Abstract

Taking its cue from the Islamic Ecological Paradigm, deeply rooted in Islamic religious traditions, which emerged more than 1400 years ago, this paper reimagines the human-nonhuman relationship against the backdrop of the arguably assumed superiority of mankind in (Islamic) theological discourses. Using Qurʾānic narratives as a key point of divergence in the natural superiority of man within the idea of vicegerency, we argue that the Qurʾān’s egalitarian ethos presents animals as ‘intentional political agents’ (Pepper 2021: 30) independent of human intercession. This agency enables them to be key players in deciding the outcomes of political conundrums; in so doing, it also rebuts and destabilises arrogant anthropocentric presuppositions associated with the idea of vicegerency. We particularly read, in ‘signs themed’ Qurʾānic narratives, a dynamic relationship between humans and animals through the animal’s role as Allah’s warriors and agents against human oppressors and transgressors. Drawing on the Islamic Ecological Paradigm, Angie Pepper’s idea of intentional political agency and Sarra Tlili’s de-anthropocentric reading of the Qurʾān, we suggest that the Qurʾān robustly invites humans to reflect on the animal world by foregrounding animals as political agents while epitomising human accountability and responsibility towards them instead of establishing a relationship of dominance.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology
Author:

Abstract

Bees for Peace promotes pollinator protection by establishing blooming feeding sites for bees and other pollinators on the grounds of houses of worship. In Canada, the project’s primary aim was to educate people about native bees, invoking positive feelings that moved people to protect these relatively unfamiliar creatures. To do so, I developed fun, educational games and talks on the cultural history of bees, which I presented at numerous churches in the Greater Toronto Area. Despite ongoing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the project and its student researchers were able to partner with two churches to plant pollinator gardens. The educational activities that accompanied the care and maintenance of these gardens resulted in individuals in and around the churches experiencing an expanded sense of community as well as a heightened awareness of native pollinators and the desire to protect them.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

Abstract

Origin stories reveal the myriad causes that converge to birth a new initiative. On the occasion of its tenth anniversary, this essay looks back to document the context and intellectual lineage out of which the Ecology, Spirituality, and Religion graduate program at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) emerged in 2013, and suggests some possibilities for the future of transdisciplinary education and the fields of religion and ecology (e.g. Tucker and Grim 2001), religion and nature (e.g. B. Taylor 2010), and spiritual ecology (e.g. Sponsel 2012) more broadly.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology