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Volume Editor:
The covert interplay between violence and economies has long eluded public scrutiny, remaining a neglected topic in academic and policy circles alike.
Amidst the proclamation of the “liberal peace”, democratic nations in the 90s sidestepped discussions on violent influences within their borders. Yet, the repercussions of economic violence, spanning psychological trauma to societal upheaval, persist globally.
Beyond preconceived ideas limiting violence to geographic areas and certain political regimes, identifying the profiteers and veiled beneficiaries of such systems is paramount.
This understanding is crucial in dismantling the undemocratic underpinnings of economies of violence, fostering a path towards equity and peace.

Contributors are Arturo Alvarado, Alain Bauer, Clotilde Champeyrache, Julien Dechanet, Nazia Hussain, David Izadifar, Louise Shelley, and Guillaume Soto-Mayor.

Abstract

The Indian diaspora plays a crucial role in developing strong bilateral synergies between India and the UAE. The collaboration includes remittances, trade, connectivity, tourism, education, health, culture and cuisine, among other things. The quantum of investment and trade cooperation between both countries explains the depth of their relationship. This penetration is linked to the Indian diaspora, which shapes the constituents of meaningful cooperation. The Indian migrant inflow into the UAE started to increase in the 1970s, drawn by the oil economy, coupled with global events such as globalisation and economic liberalisation. The UAE’s political dispensation, albeit conservative, has allowed the diasporic communities the space to pursue their aspirations in myriad fields. The Indian diaspora capitalises on this scope for shared success. Therefore, this paper examines the constituents of bilateralism, the India–UAE partnership and their mutual dependencies, and the role of the Indian diaspora as a significant factor in the bilateral exercise.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

This paper focuses on Indo-Canadian Sikh women’s issues after Covid-19 and their challenges of diasporic consciousness. It is based on a study conducted with face-to-face interviews in Victoria, Canada, to assess these women’s post-Covid-19 challenges in healthcare and employment and their diasporic dual identity crisis. The research addressed questions like: What are the challenges of Indo-Canadian Sikh women in Canada after Covid-19 and the impact of current political affairs? What are women’s integration challenges (perhaps insecurity, discrimination, etc.)? This research is significant for understanding the difficulties of Indo-Canadian Sikh women as a vulnerable group in terms of diasporic dual consciousness, racial discrimination and post-Covid experiences. Discussions on identity incorporate a diasporic theoretical understanding of the dual identity crisis and elaborate on Canadian multicultural policy from a political perspective.

In: Diaspora Studies

Summary

On 1 October 2004, a new Royal Netherlands Embassy building opened in Warsaw, Poland. Its striking, contemporary appearance surprises and seduces at the same time: glass, concrete and wood artfully intersect in a sophisticated design that champions transparency and openness. This four-year building project commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs was entrusted to the highly acclaimed Dutch architect Erick van Egeraat (b. 1956). His carefully conceived architectural programme invites a wider discussion on the ways in which embassy architecture can support the aspirations of modern diplomacy. To this end, this article situates the Dutch Embassy building within the wider context of Dutch–Polish diplo-matic relations and examines how its design contributes to defining the practice of Dutch diplomacy. It also proposes a comparative view of trends within Dutch embassy architecture by considering other contemporary ex-amples in South America, Central Europe and Africa.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
The analysis of geopolitics and energy security policies in the Caspian region is a challenging research task. This is because of the specific development of international relations in this region and the evolution of its importance in the context of the functioning of the global energy market. Due to its special geopolitical location in central Eurasia and at the junction at the world’s largest trading routes, the region is gaining in importance, both politically and economically in contemporary international relations, and becoming a place where actors involved satisfy the need for energy security.

Summary

Much of the research on gender and diplomacy has focused on those already let into the ‘club’. This article analyses the ‘threshold’ to diplomacy: security clearance processes. Security vetting ultimately determines who progresses, and what level of clearance (and therefore seniority or position) a diplomat can achieve. This article seeks to trace the journey for individuals entering a diplomatic career. It argues that security vetting is simultaneously based on legitimate processes for assessing potential national security threats, and on values interpretation (such as loyalty, maturity and trustworthiness) which may invite bias or lead to illegitimate processes of exclusion. By excavating the gendered history of vetting, we can better understand the limitations of the current de-historicised and ‘impartial’ process. We argue that clearance processes have not sufficiently evolved over the past decades of social progress, which has negative implications for the evolution of diplomacy as a social practice.

Open Access
In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Geopolitical Logics of Chinese, American, and Russian Assistance
What motivates states to assist other countries in need? Focusing on Chinese, Russian, and American decisions about COVID-19 aid, this book illuminates the role of historically contingent ideas in donors’ decisions. Drawing on the theoretical insights of the critical geopolitics tradition, it advances and tests explanations for aid-related decisions on a novel global dataset of COVID-19 aid. Rigorously theorized, meticulously researched, and accessibly written, this book illuminates the ways in which China and Russia seek to reshape the humanitarian field consistent with their geopolitical visions. Their competition with the US over approaches to aid has weakened the integrity of humanitarian system.
Volume Editor:
Where is Marxism in International Relations? The answer lies in this collective work by Brazilian authors who have looked to Marxist theory for an alternative perspective, and therefore outside the dominant ideas in the field, to analyse International Relations. Specifically, the answer is divided into themes: key ideas by Marx and Engels for IR, Marxist thinkers as IR theorists, Marxist theories on imperialism, and the Latin-American theory on dependency. With the end result, this book adds to the international intellectual efforts to criticize and overcome capitalism.
In: Marxism and International Relations
In: Geopolitics and Energy Security Policies in the Caspian Region