Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,636 items for :

  • Religious Studies x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

In Yorùbá traditional religious beliefs and practices, the role of Àyàn (Drummers) cannot be overstated. For that reason, as scholars of Yoruba art studies, to deny the relevance of Ìlù (Drums) as an indispensable component of Yoruba art and religion is to threaten its deeper understanding. Language is also a vital approach to a deeper understanding of African art. Yoruba art, for instance, is the primary medium through which the Yorùbá philosophy, cultural values, and history are stored and verbally expressed. Thus, a proficiency or nearly competency in the reading, writing, and speaking of the language of the African people whose art we study is vital to a deeper understanding of African art. Also fundamental to a deeper understanding of Yorùbá art is to recognize its unique context that usually embraces a variety of verbal and nonverbal components, which in themselves are works of art. The language of the drum in the Yorùbá Egúngún performative context is a good example. As a native speaker and culture bearer, who is fully aware of the fundamental importance of language in African art studies, the author examines the interconnection of Àyàn and Egúngún from the vantage point of Yorùbá language. The study delves into the root of Egúngún within the Yorùbá cultural context in which the people concretize and validate their thought system in visual and verbal forms. The study provides an overview of Yorùbá drums and their ritual contexts as well as the Yorùbá ontological concept of Egúngún, one of the most valued patrons of Àyàn as an important form of Yorùbá religious beliefs and practices. Using the Egúngún performance in Òkè-Igbó as a case study, the study argues that dance and drum performances can and should be analyzed as a “third dimension” of oríkì, in addition to verbal and the visual of Abiodun’s theoretical framework as demonstrated in his timeless book, Yoruba Art and Language – Seeking the African in African Art (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

In April 2020 there was an inordinate spike in COVID-19 related deaths in Kano State, northern Nigeria, due to a lack of adherence to the national public health emergency recommendations. This article aims to explain why this public health fiasco occurred. Utilizing secondary academic literature and news reports from local media, the article interrogates the manifestation of Islam in northern Nigeria and the resulting undermining of the country’s coronavirus mitigation response. The evidence from Kano State indicates that religious authorities failed to heed the suspension of congregational prayers as the relevant health agencies advised, due to a belief in the exceptionality of northern Nigeria as a theocratic substate in a secular federation. The article therefore highlights the challenges of communicating public health risk in a context where the authority of religious leaders, real or imagined, undercuts the power of state institutions.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

This article employs social listening techniques to capture the themes and public response to popular coronavirus-related social media posts made by leaders via their public Facebook pages at two of Ghana’s largest and fastest-growing churches: The Church of Pentecost (CoP) and the United Denominations Originating from the Lighthouse Group of Churches (UD-OLGC). We examine how religious leaders employed social media in response to the pandemic, and how these religious groups reinforced their relevance and reinvented themselves in the face of COVID-19. Additionally, we explore the major beliefs, perceptions, and values that the church’s social media users portrayed in response to the church’s pandemic postings, using social listening techniques and sentiment analysis. These results show how, while adapting to the realities demanded by the pandemic, the social media presence of two of Ghana’s largest churches served as a site for the contestation and negotiation of the religious authority of the leadership.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
Free access
In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic flustered dimensions of public and private life in varied ways. In Nigeria, as in several parts of the world, faith-based groups variously tried to make sense of the event as they also try to cope with government ‘lockdown’ measures introduced to contain and limit the spread of the virus. This study focuses on the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), one of the largest megachurches within global religious landscapes. The study compares the narratives birthed within the RCCG to what obtained among other Pentecostal denominational leaders to make sense of the pandemic as everyone confronted a befuddling global event. Both science and religion became instruments of discerning the meaning of the pandemic, sometimes as competing and sometimes reconciled.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

This article discusses the role of mega size African Pentecostal/charismatic prophets and charismatic figures in the public response to Covid-19. There were responses to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic in late 2019, and in Africa, a lot of these were religious. This article examines the intersection between religion and the Covid-19 pandemic, in the context contemporary African charismatic-prophetism. The data is sought mainly from oral and media sources of the various charismatic figures at the center of the discussion. The same religious interpretations that inform the understanding of events in society and human life in Africa were extended to the interpretation, diagnosis, and response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The charismatic power and influence of Pentecostal/charismatic church leaders, such as Emmanuel Makandiwa of Zimbabwe, was evident through the public role that the prophets played as these churches articulated their responses to the pandemic as a public health issue with spiritual implications.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

During European colonial times in Africa and elsewhere, missionary education was an integral part of the colonial instruments for political domination, economic exploitation, and cultural assimilation. This paper aims to investigate the process of making colonial subjects through missionary education that was mainly provided by Catholic and Evangelical mission schools during the Italian colonial period in Eritrea. The paper argues that the Catholic and Evangelical mission schools distinctively worked to achieve their separate objectives that can be explained as employment versus salvation, teaching versus preaching, flag versus Bible, and hands versus soul, respectively. While the Catholic mission school focused on training the hand in order to supply labour, the Evangelical mission school stressed harvesting the soul to cultivate a docile labour force. Despite their differences, the works of the Catholic and Evangelical mission schools placed much emphasis on and exerted much effort to producing a class of colonial subjects that could serve as brokers of power.

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Abstract

Prayer camps are Pentecostal healing centres established across various parts of Ghana. Prayer camps in Ghana have become notable centres offering mainly spiritual help to people with mental health conditions. Arguably, prayer camps serve as a breakpoint or watershed between traditional healing shrines and the ‘gardens’ operated by Spiritual churches, popularly known as Sunsum sorè, in Ghana. Analysing data collected from fieldwork between 2019 and 2021, this article shows that the healing rituals for the mentally ill at prayer camps in Ghana share similarities with traditional healing shrine practices. The article argues that while such practices reveal the appropriation of traditional healing approaches at prayer camps, they also bring the tension and contestation inherent to the concept of appropriation into perspective.

In: Exchange
Author:
The Editors The Editors
Free access
In: Exchange