Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 65,170 items for :

  • American Studies x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Europe, Africa and the Americas, 1500-1830
Series Editors: and
The explosion of boundaries that took place in the early modern period—cultural and intellectual, no less than social and political—is the subject of this exciting series that explores the meeting of peoples, products, ideas, and traditions in the early modern Americas, Africa, and Europe. The Atlantic World provides a forum for scholarly work—original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations—on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period bridging the original Columbian "encounter" and the abolition of slavery. It moves away from traditional historiographical emphases that isolate continents and nation-states and toward a broader terrain that includes non-European perspectives. It also encourages a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes will include the commerce of ideas and products; the exchange of religions and traditions; the institution of slavery; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy. It welcomes studies that employ diverse forms of analysis and from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies.

Manuscripts (preferably in English) should be 90,000 to 180,000 words in length and may include illustrations. The editors would be interested to receive proposals for specialist monographs and syntheses but may also consider multi-authored contributions such as conference proceedings and edited volumes, as well as thematic works and source translations.
History, Societies, Environments and Cultures
A peer-reviewed series of “state-of-the-field” handbooks to provide up-to-date surveys of themes, places, persons, movements, events, and more in the history of the Americas from the earliest times to the present and of the societal, environmental, and cultural forces that shaped them. Written by teams of foremost specialists in their respective fields, these companions aim to offer new approaches to area studies and to open up critical questions to discussion, but also to provide full and balanced accounts and syntheses of debate and the state of scholarship in the field. Each volume is constructed in a similar manner: a small number of introductory chapters to present the current narratives and update recent historiography followed by a larger number of thematic chapters.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Dr Kate Hammond. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Alessandra Giliberto.
This peer-reviewed book series offers an international forum for high-quality scholarly studies on the indigenous languages of South, Central and North America, including the Arctic. Around 1,000 genealogically and typologically very diverse languages are spoken in this immense region. Due to ecological and cultural pressure this treasure trove of languages is often highly endangered with extinction, hence the urgency of its preservation and study. The publications in this series will concern both descriptive and analytical work on American indigenous languages, and include handbooks, language surveys, grammatical descriptions and theoretical, historical, areal and typological monographs or particularly well-organized edited volumes with a central theme. Even though the scope of the series is international, authors are encouraged to write in English to reach as large as possible a readership.

This series looks at the different literary traditions of the United States, including African American literature, Native American literature, Chicano and US latino literature, Asian American literature, as well as emergent literatures such as Indian or Arab American.
Although the series' focus is mostly comparative, multiethnic, and intercultural, it also welcomes feature analyses of single literary traditions.
Issues of race, ethnicity, class gender, and the interspace between the political and the aesthetic, among other possible topics, figure prominently in the series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Author:

Abstract

This article analyzes the repetitive stories that Cuban journalists, community members, and others have told about Emilio Duanes Duvarcer, the Haitian who migrated to Cuba in his youth and allegedly lived to be 120 years old. Although underemphasized by international journalists, Duanes’s Haitian birth and history of migration were crucial to his claim of longevity, since they were responsible for the archival and cultural conditions that made his claim plausible and impossible to (dis)prove. However, the appeal of his story required transforming him into a Cuban through journalistic repetitions and statements, symbolically linking him to canonical moments in Cuban history. By analyzing repeated stories, their variations, and their slippages, this article provides insights into the racism that continues to affect Blacks and immigrant descendants in Cuba—not to mention efforts to challenge these stereotypes. It ends with reflections about which stories and identities are highlighted in Cuba’s burgeoning digital media landscape and which are overcrowded by traditional repetitions of Cuban revolutionary nationalism.

Open Access
In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids
Author:

Abstract

Drawing on official imperial discourses in the Russian Empire and archival documents of the Orenburg Border Commission (1799–1856), the Russian imperial administrative institution subordinated to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, this paper analyzes the ransoming, release, and reintegration of freed Russian subjects and shows how these processes and practices were inextricably linked to the Russian imperial concept of political belonging. In such a context, the concepts of freedom and liberation must be questioned; that is, we must determine the extent to which “freedom” can represent a universal value and is legally defined and thus dependent on sociopolitical situations and frameworks. To contribute to a more precise and multifaceted understanding of “freedom” and “dependency” as well as “freeing” and “enslavement,” this article examines the liberation and repatriation of enslaved Russian subjects in the Central Asian khanates of Khiva and Bukhara in the first half of the nineteenth century.

In: Journal of Global Slavery

Abstract

This introductory essay to the special issue Beyond Slavery and Freedom? makes concrete suggestions how we might move beyond this binary and why we should do so. The introduction argues that the conceptual pair slavery/freedom is deeply entwined with narratives of modernity and progress and has shaped scholarship in very diverse fields. On the basis of empirical research from the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies (BCDSS), we identify six possible pathways of thematically and methodologically moving beyond slavery/freedom that the contributions to the special issue address: 1) investigating forms of dependency that are not usually defined as slavery, 2) paying attention to semantic fields that are closely connected to this binary but not usually understood in relation to it, 3) highlighting the connection between (political, institutional) power and dependency, 4) engaging with post-slavery periods and experiences, 5) problematizing the challenges of identifying slavery in non-written records, and 6) underscoring the voice of actors.

Free access
In: Journal of Global Slavery
Author:

Abstract

Louis de Grandpré’s book Voyage à la Côte Occidentale d’Afrique, published in 1801, is well-known to historians of Africa working on the eighteenth-century Loango Coast, located in the Cabinda province of Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In describing the laws and customs of the African societies in this region, de Grandpré invites the reader to imagine these societies as “feudal” in character and draws on the semantics of “slavery” in doing so. This article proposes that we need to place this text in the context in which it was written, namely the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. We also need to consider why the author published this book in the first place, in order to understand how the terms “slave” and “slavery” function in this text. The article argues that Louis de Grandpré used the feudal/slavery nexus consciously in order to provide a legitimizing framework for a possible French conquest, hoping to prove his own loyalty and usefulness to Napoleon.

In: Journal of Global Slavery
Free access
In: Journal of Global Slavery