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Intimations of the Local in a Globalised World
Volume Editors: and
This volume examines how Indigenous theatre and performance from Oceania has responded to the intensification of globalisation from the turn of the 20th to the 21st centuries. It foregrounds a relational approach to the study of Indigenous texts, thus echoing what scholars such as Tui Nicola Clery have described as the stance of a “Multi-Perspective Culturally Sensitive Researcher.” To this end, it proposes a fluid vision of Oceania characterized by heterogeneity and cultural diversity calling to mind Epeli Hau‘ofa’s notion of “a sea of islands.”

Taking its cue from the theories of Deleuze and Guattari, the volume offers a rhizomatic, non-hierarchical approach to the study of the various shapes of Indigeneity in Oceania. It covers Indigenous performance from Aotearoa/New Zealand, Hawai’i, Samoa, Rapa Nui/Easter Island, Australia and the Torres Strait Islands. Each chapter uses vivid case histories to explore a myriad of innovative strategies responding to the interplay between the local and the global in contemporary Indigenous performance. As it places different Indigenous cultures from Oceania in conversation, this critical anthology gestures towards an “imparative” model of comparative poetics, favouring negotiation of cultural difference and urging scholars to engage dialogically with non-European artistic forms of expression.
Rooted in a range of approaches to the reception of classical drama, the chapters in this book reflect, in one way or another, that Greek and Roman drama in performance is an ongoing dialogue between the culture(s) of the original and the target culture of its translation/adaptation/performance. The individual case studies highlight the various ways in which the tradition of Greek and Roman plays in performance has been extremely productive, but also the ways in which it has engaged, at times dangerously, in political and social discourse.
A Translation of Mayama Seika’s Genroku Chūshingura
The revenge of the 47 rōnin is the most famous vendetta in Japanese history and it continues to inspire the popular imagination today. Written between 1934 and 1941, Mayama Seika’s ten-play cycle Genroku Chūshingura is a unique retelling of the incident based on his own painstaking research into the historical facts.
Considered a modern masterpiece, it now has a secure place in the Kabuki repertoire and many of the plays are still frequently performed.
For the first time, Seika’s monumental achievement is here translated into English in its complete and original form by three experienced experts in the field.
The Hero on Stage from the Enlightenment to the Early Twenty-First Century
Volume Editor:
Hercules Performed explores the reception of the ancient Greek hero Herakles – the Roman Hercules – on the western stage from the sixteenth century to the present day, focusing on live theatre, including tragedy, comedy and musical drama. Each chapter considers a particular work or theme in detail, exploring the interplay between classical models and a wide variety of modern performance contexts. The volume is one of four to be published in the Metaforms series examining the extraordinarily persistent figuring of Herakles-Hercules in western culture, drawing together scholars from a range of disciplines to offer a unique insight into the hero’s perennial appeal.
New Directions in International Theatre and Performance
Series Editor:
Published in association with the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR), this series is a platform for innovative scholarly work that takes seriously the pledge of the international. We ask: what promise does this term hold for Theatre and Performance Studies today? First coined in the late eighteenth century to define a space for inter-state relations, the term has since migrated from law to political and cultural practice, retaining connotations of an ever-expanding, progressive vision of global cooperation. Theatre and Performance Studies have long pursued the promise of the international, from re-thinking “national” canons to developing novel theoretical and methodological foundations for the study of theatre and performance. The series publishes both monographs and edited volumes that represent and at the same time critically interrogate these very processes. We thus invite submissions that examine the evolving diversity of performances from Eurasia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. We seek to become an intellectual home to manuscripts that contain an overtly international or transnational dimension, explore new historical, methodological and geographical frontiers, and address pressing contemporary concerns.

For information on the IFTR and its annual conferences, please see the organization’s website: www.iftr.org.

For inquiries regarding the Series, please contact the Editors, Milija Gluhovic (m.gluhovic@warwck.ac.uk) and Emine Fişek (emine.fisek@boun.edu.tr).

Interested authors are invited to submit proposals for collected volumes to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Volume Editor:
Against the backdrop of an insurgent far right and numerous deadly neo-Nazi attacks, various cultural practitioners have written far-right violence into Germany’s collective memory and imagined more inclusive futures in its wake. This volume explores contemporary examples from literature, music, theatre, film, television and art that respond to this situation. They demonstrate that, alongside the ways in which art expands the public sphere in terms of what is said and who is heard, aesthetic questions of how artistic works are presented are a crucial part of how they open up new perspectives.
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Der Beitrag argumentiert anhand der Romane 89/90 von Peter Richter und Als ich mit Hitler Schnapskirschen aß von Manja Präkels, dass zahlreiche Texte der sogenannten Wendekinder-Generation die Themen von Gewalterfahrung und (politischer) Radikalisierung unter Jugendlichen in den frühen 1990er Jahren in den literarischen und öffentlichen Diskurs zur Wende- und Nachwendeerzählung einschreiben. Die Texte werden als Adoleszenzromane, Wendeliteratur und literarisches Archiv zur jugendlichen Subkultur der frühen 1990er Jahre betrachtet. Die neuen Freiheiten der Heranwachsenden werden durch die Ausbreitung eines rechten Spektrums eingeschränkt –Strategien im Umgang mit der aufkommenden Gewalt (Aufbruchsstimmung oder Desillusionierung) werden untersucht. Es wird beobachtet, dass es aus Sicht der Figuren weniger die weltpolitischen Ereignisse sind, die den Schritt zum Erwachsenwerden ausmachen; zentral stehen Verlust von Freundschaften, Spaltung der jugendlichen Gemeinschaft und Gewalterfahrung. Die Adoleszenz bildet hier metaphorisch Transformation ab und bietet so ein universell verständliches Erzählformat für die Erzählung über die Wende und Nachwendezeit.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany
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This essay explores the affective assemblages of abjection and pessimism in the Netflix series Dogs of Berlin. I argue that the series offers a critique of neoliberal cosmopolitanism and its narratives of progress both on the level of narration and on the level of affect, sensation and temporalities. With its pre-emptive narration, its evocation of complex factual and fictional temporalities of Berlin and its emphasis on abjection, Dogs of Berlin questions and challenges the promises of neoliberal cosmopolitanism, foregrounding its intensely corrosive and fatal forces from precarity to racism and homophobia. Engaging with theories of abjection, particularly those pertaining to the questions of migration and alterity such as Peter Nyers’s framework of “abject cosmopolitanism”, I view Dogs of Berlin as a powerful intervention into reconciliatory narratives of neoliberal discourse.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany

Abstract

In diesem literaturwissenschaftlichen Artikel wird das Künstlernetzwerk BSMG (Black Superman Group) und ihr Album Platz an der Sonne (2017) als politisierter künstlerischer Protest gegen Rassismus untersucht. Der Fokus liegt auf der poetischen Faktur und der Werkstruktur des Albums, wobei auch Bobbie Serranos Illustrationen der Regenmacher Tour, die Features Edition des Albums analysiert werden. Dabei wird gezeigt, wie sich das Künstlernetzwerk als Zusammenschluss gegen Rassismus inszeniert und alternative Formen von Zugehörigkeit und ein multidimensionales positives Selbstbild Schwarzer Deutscher präsentiert, das zur Identifikation mit den selbsternannten Black Supermen aufruft. Die musikalisch-poetische Vernetzung der Künstler*innen mit Aktivist*innen und Freiheitskämpfer*innen soll dabei zur Identifikation mit dem Netzwerk anregen.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany
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Abstract

The arson attack on the Genç home occurred in the early morning of 29 May 1993 in Solingen, North Rhine-Westphalia, when a group of four young men set the home ablaze, killing five and maiming fourteen of its residents. The arson represented the diverging realities of majority and minority groups through policy-driven and geographical dislocations, separating an ethnonational German identity from a diasporic Turkish one, and epitomised a distinct period when architecture simultaneously represented the construction and erasure of collective memory; the nation, on one hand, emphasised Holocaust remembrance as an aspect of German identity by cementing memorials, while, on the other, “Germanness” incited several racist arson attacks, one destroying the Genç home. In challenging the existing Solingen memorials – and therefore memory culture broadly – “Building Up in Flames” proposes a new methodology for remembrance by forensically analysing typological documentation of similar houses and available TV news segments to partially rebuild the house anew. The culminating series of architectural drawings negotiates memory and destruction by acknowledging the perpetuation of violence across time and smuggling memory within the reappearance of violence – enlivening memory within time itself. These “redrawings” reject the acontextuality of the current memorials to instead invigorate their necessity, therefore empowering architecture itself.

In: Cultural Responses to the Far Right in Contemporary Germany