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Author: Gohar Muradyan
Greek myths were, to some extent, familiar to medieval Armenian authors, mainly through translations of late classical and early Christian writings; they also appear in original works, but this knowledge was never profound or accurate. Both translators and Armenian authors, as well as later scribes, while translating, renarrating and copying short mythical stories, or mentioning or just alluding to them often related the stories and the familiar or unfamiliar names occurring in them correctly, but sometimes they made mistakes, chiefly corrupting names not well-known to them, and sometimes, even details of the plot.
This is the first study which brings together the references to ancient Greek myths (154 episodes) in medieval Armenian literature by including the original Armenian and Greek (if extant) text and translation. With appendices listing the occurrences of Greek gods, their Armenian equivalents, images, altars, temples, and rites, the Aesopian fables and the Trojan war.
Premodern Chinese Texts in Western Translation
Volume Editors: Leo Tak-hung Chan and Zong-qi Cai
This collected volume focuses on the history of Western translation of premodern Chinese texts from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Divided into three parts, individual chapters feature close readings of translated texts, micro-studies of how three translations came into being, and broad-based surveys that inquire into the causes of historical change. Among the specific questions addressed are: What stylistic, generic, and discursive permutations were undergone by Chinese texts as they crossed linguistic borders? Who were the main agents in this centuries-long effort to transmit Chinese culture? How did readership considerations affect the form that particular translations take? More generally, there is a concern with the relevance of current research paradigms, like those of World Literature, transcultural reception, and the rewriting of translation history.
Editor / Translator: Oliver Kahl
ʿAlī ibn Sahl Rabban aṭ-Ṭabarī's Indian Books, completed in the year 850 CE as an appendix to his medico-philosophical chef-d'œuvre "Paradise of Wisdom", belong to the most remarkable texts in Arabic scientific literature. The Indian Books offer a unique, interpretative summary of the main tenets of Ayurvedic medicine, as understood by Arabic-speaking scholars on the basis of now lost translations from Sanskrit. The present book centres around a critical edition and annotated translation of this crucial text, framed by a detailed introduction and extensive glossaries of terms. Ṭabarī's learned exposé of Ayurveda also throws a more nuanced light on the allegedly uncontested supremacy of Greek humoralism in 9th-century Arabic medicine.
The Zhou Changes, better known in the West as I Ching, is one of the masterpieces of world literature.
This book, the climax of more than forty years of research in Chinese archaeology, explores the text’s origins in the oracle-bone and milfoil divinations of Bronze Age China and how it transformed over the course of the Zhou dynasty into the first of the Chinese classics.
The book provides an in-depth survey of the theory and practice of divination to demonstrate how the hexagram and line statements of the text were produced and how they were understood at the time.
Editor / Translator: Joern Peter Grundmann
Author: Tsung-i Jao
Editor / Translator: David J. Lebovitz
Editors: Zong-qi Cai and Yuan Xingpei
Chinese Texts in the World publishes scholarly works on the reception, transmission, assimilation, and reinvention of Chinese texts in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas; as well as critical studies that explore new pathways connecting Chinese texts with today’s world.
Whether Chinese texts were transmitted along the ancient Silk Road, or through modern digital technologies, such well-traveled texts hold great promise for illuminating multiple aspects of China’s cultural relations with the world. The same holds true for the examination how reconfigured Chinese texts made their way back to China, to be reconstituted as culturally polyvalent, hybrid “imports”.
Critical studies explore new ways of engaging Chinese texts with non-Chinese intellectual and cultural traditions. Such studies include, but are not limited to, a traditional textually grounded Sinological work that contains a substantive dialogue with for instance Western texts; a collaborative work by Asia-based and non-Asia-based scholars on the critical issues important to different traditions; and even a work on non-Chinese texts as long as it significantly draws insights from or engages a substantive dialogue with the Chinese traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. Manuscripts that are published have been accepted after double-anonymous peer review.

《世界语境下的中国典籍》系列丛书包括两大类学术著作。一类是中国典籍接受史的研究,着重分析各种典籍在亚洲、欧洲、非洲和南北美洲的接受、传播、同化与再发明过程;另一类是典籍的文本研究,努力在今日的世界语境中重新诠释中国典籍,并寻求开拓与世界各种文化传统互动交流的新途径。
第一类著作注重传统意义上的典籍接受史研究,所涵盖的文献,既有沿古代丝绸之路流布的古代典籍,也有通过现代数字技术传播的论著。此类著作主要探究中国典籍在中国以外地区(包括亚洲、欧洲、非洲和美洲等地)传播、再解释、再创造、进一步传播过程中,体现了哪些不同路径。除此之外,也将分析这些经过重新加工的典籍文本怎样回到中国,然后又怎样作为多元文化的混合“舶来品”被吸纳接收,再次发展。这套丛书还将综述分析中国典籍翻译如何塑造海外各地对中国文化的看法。这套丛书意在开拓广大非专业读者、学生、学者们的视野,帮助他们在自身的文学和文化传统中发掘出未被留意的中国因素,也可能对中国文化影响形成全新理解。对于从事国学研究的学生和学者而言,这套丛书能帮助他们掌握西方学界在西方批评范式的影响下重新解释中国文献的最新趋势。
第二类著作注重广义上的文本分析研究,目标在于建立中文文本和异域知识文化传统之间新的互动关系。这种广义文本研究充分体现跨文化视野,其中包括三种学术成果:其一、能够与西方传统进行内容比较的汉学著作;其二、亚洲学者与西方的学者针对重要议题而展开的合着或;其三、能与中国学术和文化传统展开有实质意义的西方学术著作。
数千年来,丰富多彩的中文典籍文本历经万里,远赴各方,编织出一条条连接中国和世界文化的纽带。中国典籍文本在世界各地的传播过程,对于加深彼此相互了解,共同推动人类文明的进步具有极为深远的意义。我们希望,读者们能够通过阅读这套丛书,追溯中文文献的流传、以及观察当今中华文化的传播和再造的过程,深切体验激动人心的的文化探胜之旅。
A great number of historical examples show how desperate people sought to obtain a glimpse of the future or explain certain incidents retrospectively through signs that had occurred in advance. In that sense, signs are always considered a portent of future events. In different societies, and at different times, the written or unwritten rules regarding their interpretation varied, although there was perhaps a common understanding of these processes.
This present volume collates essays from specialists in the field of prognostication in the European Middle Ages.
Contributors are Klaus Herbers, Wolfram Brandes, Zhao Lu, Rolf Scheuermann, Thomas Krümpel, Bernardo Bertholin Kerr, Gaelle Bosseman, Julia Eva Wannenmacher (†), Matthias Kaup, Vincent Gossaert, Jürgen Gebhardt, Matthias Gebauer, Richard Landes.