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Between Disruption and Encounter
Global Catholicism: Between Disruption and Encounter opens the Studies in Global Catholicism series with an examination of a worldwide religious institution that up to now has been more globally extensive than truly globalized. It explores the world historical and theological meaning of de-Europeanization with church data by world region. Readers get an in-depth look at the institutional and theological capacity and limits of the cosmopolitan reality of today’s Catholic Church. Its integrated perspective, grounded in cultural and political history together with an ecclesiology of post-Vatican II Catholicism, offers a new way to approach today’s emerging post-colonial, inter-cultural Global Catholicism as centuries-old trajectories are disrupted and pressing new realities demand original responses.
Conversations with Older Roman Catholic Sisters
This book explores the experience and understanding of Roman Catholic sisters of their vocation to the apostolic form of religious life as they age.Based on interviews with twelve religious women, it draws on the practice of Lectio Divina to explore how these women describe their call to service and activity at a time in life when these might be curtailed by physical diminishment and increasingly reduced social interaction and influence.As the very institutions of religious life are themselves under threat, the book identifies new emerging forms of ministry through presence, to each other and to their carers.
The Yearbook of Muslims in Europe is an essential resource for analysis of Europe's dynamic Muslim populations. Featuring up-to-date research from forty-three European countries, this comprehensive reference work summarises significant activities, trends, and developments within those communities.

Each new volume reports on the most current information available from surveyed countries, offering an annual overview of statistical and demographic data, topical issues of public debate, shifting transnational networks, change to domestic policies and legal frameworks, and major activities in Muslim organisations and institutions. Supplementary data is gathered from a variety of sources and evaluated according to its reliability.

In addition to offering a relevant framework for original research, the Yearbook of Muslims in Europe provides an invaluable source of reference for government and NGO officials, journalists, policymakers, and related research institutions.
Editor:
A team of experts view the relationship between rulers and their leading subjects across Europe and further afield. If God-derived authority legitimized a monarch’s rule, it did not necessarily prevent opposition to perceived arbitrary government as subjects put forward the counter-concept of consensual rule. The provincial elite might serve the ruler as advisors and officers at court but they also possessed an independent source of power based on their extensive estates. While monarchs wanted to perpetuate a system in which they could watch over members of the regional elite at court and keep them busy, they sought to make use of them as local and provincial administrators, that is, as long as they remained loyal: a fraught balancing act.  

Contributors include: Hélder Carvalhal, Peter Edwards, Jemma Field, Cailean Gallagher, Pedro José Herades-Ruiz, Graeme S. Millen, Vita Malašinskiené, Tibor Monostori, Steve Murdoch, David Potter, Peter S. Roberts, Irene Maria Vicente-Martin, and Matthias Wong.

Abstract

The emergence of a Jacobite concept of monarchy in the wake of the Glorious Revolution has been a subject of confusion and neglect. It is a commonplace that the Revolution of 1688 was due in part to James II and VI’s failure to respect civil liberties, his persecution of critics and his extension of Crown prerogative beyond limits that were acceptable to newly wealthy classes. Historians have tended to maintain that Jacobites sustained principles similar to those which led to James’s demise. But this essay demonstrates how, on the contrary, a range of Jacobite conceptions of monarchy emerged from a frustration with the Stuarts’ flawed use of the powers of the Crown. While Irish Jacobites did indeed tend to sustain absolutist principles, Archbishop Fénelon, watching the fall-out of the Glorious Revolution, encouraged Jacobite exiles in France to moderate their absolutist tendencies, and advised James Francis Stuart, the Old Pretender, that the Crown’s prerogative should be kept for promoting the common good. Andrew Michael Ramsay, Fénelon’s student and one-time tutor to Charles Edward Stuart, took this patriotic doctrine to the Jacobite court in Rome. Meanwhile, the Jacobite strategist and historian Sir James Steuart, exiled in Germany, wrote in his notes on the history of England that the Stuarts’ consistent failure to develop their idea of royal prerogative led the dynasty to the brink of a precipice, from which it toppled in the Civil War, then limped on until the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Whereas early modern historians have tended to assume continuity between Stuart absolutism and Jacobite ideas of royal prerogative, this essay reassesses the Jacobites’ historical understanding of the demise of the James II and VI and the decline of monarchic power.

In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe 
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Abstract

The English monarchy came to an abrupt end in 1649. King Charles I had lost the English Civil Wars and was put on trial for treason by radical elements of his parliament. Found guilty of levying war against his people, he was executed in January 1648/9. His execution was followed an act of parliament that abolished the English monarchy and replaced it with a Commonwealth, indicating the formal end to the rule of the Stuarts in England. It marked a symbolic conclusion to a kingly tradition unbroken from the Norman Conquest of 1066 and pushed the country into unchartered waters. This essay examines how the opinion-makers of the day – newsbook writers, astrologers and writers of instant histories – attempted to provide clarity during this turbulent time. Their narratives of denial, inevitability and natural change helped provide clarity and meaning to a disruptive event like the regicide. Despite their varied conclusions about the future of monarchy, these writers were united in their conservative responses to the regicide. These narratives gave not only direction and meaning but also comfort and reassurance in a time when the longstanding intuition of monarchy disappeared.

In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe 
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Abstract

This essay discusses the significant economic, political and ceremonial value of cloth and clothing in early Stuart England through an examination of the wardrobe expenditure of King James VI & I (1566–1625) and his wife, Anna of Denmark (1574–1619). It discusses the everyday, or ‘ordinary’, requirements of the royal couple as well as the sartorial dimensions of court ceremonial in a case study of King James’s royal entry into London on 15 March 1604. In so doing, it uncovers many of the individual makers and sellers, who supplied the royal wardrobes, and discusses some of the types and associated costs of the garments, cloth and trimmings that were transacted. The risks and benefits of court patronage are discussed, and attention is given to the fluidity of service that many merchants and makers maintained as royal servitors in receipt of wages and/or livery allowances, while concurrently working for elite clientele and/or serving customers in London. Throughout, this essay underscores the communicative power of dress, extends our understanding of the relationship between the Stuart court and London and raises ongoing questions about channels of supply, extended credit and remuneration.

In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe 
In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe 

Abstract

The comparison between the narratives describing the welcoming ceremonies put on by Marseille for the visit of Francis I and by Murcia for that of Charles V, written respectively by Francisco Cascales and Honoré Bouche, exemplifies the background to and the development of the concept of Absolutism. If the contemporary accounts represent the relationship between monarch and his subjects as a coalition between the jurisdictions of the king and the municipal institutions intermediated by the authority of the Church, Bouche’s rewriting of Francis I’s visit to Marseille portrays it as a system of power based on the subordination of municipal institutions to the king. Hence, the comparison allows further reflections on the emergence of the concept and application of the principles of Absolutism, illustrating the changing nature of the rights and obligations of monarchs and their citizens, much to the detriment of the latter.

In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe 

Abstract

This essay examines the ways in which Portuguese sixteenth century monarchs, especially João III (r.1521–1557), were able to maintain the political balance between the ruler, main courtiers and local/regional elites. It will be argued that at the time Portugal profited from a general period of political stability, which contributed greatly to the affirmation of the royal power, together with a significant degree of cooperation from – or at least interdependence with – the social and political elite. The ambitions of the upper nobility were controlled by the monarchy, as was the growth of their platforms of power. Nonetheless, they maintained considerable estates on the periphery, where they exercised their fiscal, administrative and military prerogatives. In turn, the minor and middling nobility either vied for prominent offices at court, which allowed for eventual promotion, or embarked on careers in the overseas administrative and military apparatus in the central government, or took up posts in ecclesiastical institutions.

The mutual need and reciprocity between monarch and elites did not signify extreme dependence of the latter on the Crown nor absence of disagreement. Yet, the monarch was never confronted politically nor suffered any organized attempt at deposition, as had succeeded in the late medieval period. Moreover, incidents of differences at court were not frequent, and litigation between the king and noble families was relatively scarce. In order to assess this political context, a number of qualitative and quantitative indicators will be reviewed. Particular attention will be given to the court as potential environment for the upward social mobility of the small and middling nobility. Moreover, in a comparison between the early and last few years of the reign of king João III the essay will assess the benefits attained by the upper nobility due to political cooperation, including the size and dimension of their estates, incomes and the number of their subject inhabitants. After a brief introduction, which considers the consolidation of the royal court under the Avis dynasty, the essay examines social mobility in the royal court of João III, as well as the relationship between the monarchy and regional and local elites. In order to proceed with the latter discussion, an analysis of a number of qualitative and quantitative indicators will be made, together with the exploration of a few case studies that illustrate general trends.

In: Monarchy, the Court, and the Provincial Elite in Early Modern Europe