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Abstract

Solidarity is a focal concept in the literature on South-South Cooperation (ssc). This research examines how solidarity is understood by actors involved in ssc. The literature on ssc is divided into two camps. The first camp believes that ssc is firmly grounded in solidarity. Meanwhile, the second camp holds that ssc is motivated by the state’s interest and that solidarity, if it occurs, is merely an epiphenomenon. However, this paper suggests that both camps fail to realize that the concept of solidarity manifests in different ways. Keeping this diversity in mind, a typology of solidarity based on Enlightenment ideas of liberty is utilized to systematically categorize the plurality of the concept. The typology maintains that solidarity can take shape in the form of Hobbesian self-centered solidarity, Kantian reflexive rational solidarity, Humean reflexive emotional solidarity, and Hegelian recognitive solidarity. This study analyses the Second High-Level United Nations Conference on South-South Cooperation (bapa+40) opening speeches and general debate remarks. Types of solidarity are unmasked by examining 38 statements espoused by states, international organisations, and other entities. The findings show that Kantian solidarity is the most prevalent, followed by Hobbesian, Humean, and Hegelian solidarity. Three observations can be inferred in light of these findings. First, the discourse of solidarity in ssc is diverse and multiple. Second, different understandings of solidarity are not evenly distributed amongst statements made by actors of ssc. Some forms of solidarity are more salient. Third, the idea of solidarity is ambivalent. The four types of solidarity articulated are not mutually exclusive. Instead, they can appear simultaneously in actors’ articulation.

In: Bandung

Abstract

In this article, I bring together the theory of the civil sphere and the concept of carnivalesque public space to analyze the function of symbols and discourses about the non-Western world in the construction of national identity in Brazil. I argue that the carnivalesque public space contributes to broadening and reinforcing solidarity in the civil sphere by de-nationalizing national identity. The orientalist representations that took place in Salvador’s carnival consolidated the “oriental” imaginary as an important dimension of the incipient national identity building process, as well as highlighted the ambivalences and discontinuities of the mosaic of symbolic references associated to it. This fantastic representation of the East corresponded to a particular expectation of meaning: the aesthetic contours of the national-popular boundaries in Brazil and its sense of belonging. The article analyses how national identities are created through symbolic references that are both within and beyond its own borders.

In: Bandung

Abstract

The study delved into media framing of climate change narratives and mitigation efforts towards Africa. The study selected 30 newspaper articles published between June 2021 to December 2021. Content analysis was used to analyze the framing of climate change narratives against a framework of decolonizing media narratives on climate change. It further discussed climate justice and detailed how communities most impacted by climate change are the least contributors to climate change. The study was guided by the following questions: (a) Who are the humans in the “human activities” in the climate change media narratives? (b) What harms are caused by climate change, and how can those who have created the most harm be called to bear the cost of fixing or making significant amendments? (c) How can the media frame climate change mitigation efforts in a fair, just, and equitable approach?

In: Bandung

Abstract

This research study examines the trade potential between Indonesia and Namibia, explicitly focusing on product competitiveness mapping and lessons learned from Chile and Uruguay. The analysis explores the competitiveness of export products in each country and identifies areas for improvement. The findings reveal that Indonesia has a higher number of export products with high competitiveness than Namibia. However, both countries face challenges in boosting the overall competitiveness of their export portfolios. The study emphasises the need for diversification and value-added processing to enhance export capabilities and reduce import reliance. Drawing insights from Chile and Uruguay, it highlights the importance of economic diplomacy and bilateral trade agreements in strengthening trade relations. The study concludes with recommendations for policymakers and future researchers to foster economic growth and maximise the trade potential between Indonesia and Namibia.

In: Bandung
Author:

Abstract

The world is entering a post-universal historical conjuncture marked by a “great divergence” triggered by a paroxysm of crises exacerbated by the Western world’s reluctance to accept its diminishing global role. In a panic response, the West is consolidating itself into a Euro-American Confederal Empire, engaging in a form of universal ideational warfare against emerging civilization-states in an effort to maintain its civilizational hegemony. This has resulted in an ideological engineering contest within the global public sphere pursued through the practice of “preemptive ideocide,” which seeks to perpetuate a missionary universalism that imposes Western political-cultural norms upon the world’s divergent cultural and self-governing modes of existence. This ideational warfare is situated within an emergent Cold War Two. The protagonists of this ideational warfare represent a service class of ideocrats devoted to the preservation of Western global primacy. The article highlights the key themes addressed by members of this service class who act as an elite posse of a global thought police. In conclusion, the article argues that humanity is irreversibly divided into non-convergent but non-conflictual cultural identities and proposes the adoption in the Global South of a cultural polygenesis covenant as an exit strategy from the prevailing dependency on missionary universalism’s ideational framework.

In: Bandung
Cultivation of Culture and the Global Circulation of Ideas
Through the concept of ‘Romantic nationalism’, this interdisciplinary global historical study investigates cultural initiatives in (British) India that aimed at establishing the nation as a moral community and which preceded or accompanied state-oriented political nationalism. Drawing on a vast array of sources, it discusses important Romantic nationalist traits, such as the relationship between language and identity, historicism, artistic revivalism and hero worship. Ultimately, this innovative book argues that because of the confrontation with European civilization and processes of modernization at large, cultivation of culture in British India was morally and spiritually more important to the making of the nation than in Europe.
Volume Editors: and
Edited by Rose Mary Allen and Sruti Bala, this comprehensive handbook of gender studies scholarship on the Dutch Caribbean islands thematically covers the history of movements for gender equality; the relation of gender to race, colonialism, sexuality; and the arts and popular culture. The handbook offers unparalleled insights into a century of debates around gender from the six islands of the Dutch Caribbean (Curaçao, Bonaire, Aruba, St. Maarten, St. Eustatius and Saba).

This handbook makes gender studies in the Dutch Caribbean accessible to an international readership. Besides key academic writings, it includes primary historical sources, translations from Papiamento and Dutch, as well as personal memoirs and poetry.
In: Romantic Nationalism in India
In: Romantic Nationalism in India
In: Romantic Nationalism in India