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State and Individual in Inner City Renewal and Urban Social Movement
Author: Yunqing SHI
In Becoming Citizens in China Shi Yunqing describes the two interlinked histories that have made China’s urban and economic miracle: the unfolding of inner city renewal and the production of citizen shaped by the collective rights defence action resulted from demolition and removal projects. She reveals a complex problematic tension on State and the fabric of the Individual in Social Transition in China.

This book is extremely well-documented and produced with abundant empirical materials. In this approach of the State-Individual relationship, Shi Yunqing convincingly elaborates how citizens have been produced in urban social movements against the background of differences between Chinese and Western development histories. The production of citizens in "Chinese-style” produces insightful "located knowledge" and makes a contribution to a new global sociology and more especially to the Post-Western Sociology.

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在《再造城民》这本书中,施芸卿讲述了造就中国城市和经济奇迹的两段互为表里的历史:旧城的再造与公民的生产。从国家和个人之间的相互形塑出发,她展现了中国社会转型的独特逻辑。

本书有着极其详实的法律、政策文本和田野材料,以“国家-个人”关系为研究路径,施芸卿令人信服地解释了在与西方发展历史不同的中国背景下,公民如何从都市社会运动中产生。“中国式”的公民生产提供了富于洞见的本土知识,为新的全球社会学,尤其是后西方社会学研究做出了贡献。
Author: Izabela Will
Is the relation between gestures and language conventionalized? Is it possible to investigate the backgrounds of the users by means of these gestures?
This book offers an in-depth analysis and description of five recurrent gestures used by Hausa speakers from northern Nigeria, examined from a cross-cultural perspective. The method based on studying naturalistic data available online (sermons, interviews and talk shows) can be applied to other languages with no speech corpora. Particular attention is paid to cultural practices and routinized behavior that affect both the performance of a gesture and its meaning and function. Everyday activities, such as greetings and religious rituals, as well as social hierarchy and gender differences are reflected in gestures. The results show that gestures and language reveal the shared cultural background of the speakers and reflect identical cognitive processes.
Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.
Volume Editor: Ulf Engel
This is the first edition of the Yearbook on the African Union (YBAU). The YBAU is first and foremost an academic project that will provide in-depth evaluation and analysis of the institution, its processes, and its engagements. Despite the increased agency in recent years of the African Union in general, and the AU Commission in particular, little is known – outside expert policy or niche academic circles – about the Union’s activities. This is the gap the YBAU wants to systematically address. It seeks to be a reference point for in-depth research, evidence-based policy-making and decision-making.

Contributors are: Adekeye Adebajo, Habibu Yaya Bappah, Bruce Byiers, Annie Barbara Chikwanha, Dawit Yohannes Wondemagegnehu, Katharina P.W. Döring, Jens Herpolsheimer, Jacob Lisakafu, Frank Mattheis, Henning Melber, Alphonse Muleefu, Edefe Ojomo, Awino Okech, Jamie Pring, Elizabeth Sidiropoulos, Tim Zajontz.
In African-Australian Marriage Migration: An Ethnography of (Un)happiness, Henrike A. Hoogenraad follows journeys of marriage migration among African-Australian couples. The study narrates these journeys as ‘happiness projects’, since for cross-border couples, happiness is connected to dreams for a life-long partnership that begins with the visa application. Yet, happiness is invoked as an aspired state rather than an achieved goal. The obstacles of government bureaucracy, institutional and everyday racism, and unrealistic expectations of romance prevent the hoped-for happy endings. This monograph upsets a ‘scam artist’ narrative that generalises migrant men and their sponsoring partners, and which obscures the difficult process of crossing borders both physical and intimate. Hoogenraad’s work is a welcome contribution to anthropological literature on marriage migration.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian-Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Sarah Alam, Syed Fahad Ali, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Kailan Leung, Juanna Nguyen, Dionisio Nyaga, Jasmine Pham, Vania Soepriatna, Tika Ram Thapa and Rose Ann Torres.