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This volume, examining the reception of ancient rhetoric, aims to demonstrate that the past is always part of the present: in the ways in which decisions about crucial political, social and economic matters have been made historically; or in organic interaction with literature, philosophy and culture at the core of the foundation principles of Western thought and values. Analysis is meant to cover the broadest possible spectrum of considerations that focus on the totality of rhetorical species (i.e. forensic, deliberative and epideictic) as they are applied to diversified topics (including, but not limited to, language, science, religion, literature, theatre and other cultural processes (e.g. athletics), politics and leadership, pedagogy and gender studies) and cross-cultural, geographical and temporal contexts.
Empire and Emperors in the III Century
Volume Editor: Alessandro Galimberti
The History of the Empire from the Death of Marcus of Herodian in eight books, written in Greek, is a key source for the period from the reign of Commodus (AD 180) to that of Gordian III (238). Herodian is an eyewitness and the only contemporary historian whose work has come down to us in full. His point of view is all the more valuable because he is an outsider with respect to both court historiography, whose flattery he stigmatized, and to senatorial historians, represented mainly by Cassius Dio and by the biographies in the Historia Augusta. Nonetheless, Herodian has often been harshly criticized as a historian. This volume aims to shed light on the different areas and themes in which his historical work moves - literary technique, political lexicon, religious conception, geographical space, economic, political, cultural and military themes - to better understand the relevance of his historiographical approach and his historical thought.
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Mainz, June 12-15, 2019)
Volume Editors: Marietta Horster and Nikolas Hächler
This volume presents the results of the fourteenth workshop of the international network 'Impact of Empire'. It focuses on the ways in which Rome's dominance influenced, changed, and created landscapes, and examines in which ways (Roman) landscapes were narrated and semantically represented. To assess the impact of Rome on landscapes, some of the twenty contributions in this volume analyse functions and implications of newly created infrastructure. Others focus on the consequences of colonisation processes, settlement structures, regional divisions, and legal qualifications of land. Lastly, some contributions consider written and pictorial representations and their effects. In doing so, the volume offers new insights into the notion of ‘Roman landscapes’ and examines their significance for the functioning of the Roman empire.
This volume provides a review of recent research in Philippi related to archaeology, demography, religion, the New Testament and early Christianity. Careful reading of texts, inscriptions, coins and other archaeological materials allow the reader to examine how religious practice in Philippi changed as the city moved from being a Hellenistic polis to a Roman colony to a center for Christian worship and pilgrimage. The essays raise questions about traditional understandings of material culture in Philippi, and come to conclusions that reflect more complicated and diverse views of the city and its inhabitants.
This book asks why politically-powerful entities invested in the Amphiareion, a sanctuary renowned for its precarity and dependency. The answer lies in unravelling the intricacies of the shrine’s epigraphical record and the stories about the communities and individuals responsible for creating it. By explaining patterns in inscribed display against the backdrop of broader events and phenomena emerging within central Greece, this book revisits the Amphiareion’s narrative and emphasises its political implications for its neighbours. This interpretation offers new perspectives on the sanctuary and exposes agents’ manipulation of it in the course of reinventing their self-image in a changing Greek world.
After decades of controversy, there is now a growing consensus that Greek warfare was not singular and simple, but complex and multiform. In this volume, emerging and established scholars build on this consensus to explore Greek warfare beyond its traditional focus on hoplites and the phalanx. We expand the chronological limits back into the Iron Age, the geographical limits to the central and eastern Mediterranean, and the operational limits to include cavalry, light-armed troops, and sieges. We also look beyond the battlefield at integral aspects of warfare including religion, the experiences of women, and the recovery of the war dead.
Author: Jessica Nowlin
Etruscan Orientalization provides a historiography of the terms ‘orientalizing’ and ‘orientalization’ in eighteenth through twentieth century European scholarship on early Etruscan history as it sought to understand how civilizational knowledge transferred in antiquity from East to West. This original orientalist framing of cultural influence was influenced by notions of Italian nationalism and colonialism, all traits that can still be felt in modern understandings of ‘orientalizing’ as an art historical style, chronological period, and process of cultural change. This work argues that scholarship on Mediterranean connectivity in early first millennium BCE can provide new insights by abandoning the term ‘orientalizing’.
In Kids Those Days, Lahney Preston-Matto and Mary Valante have organized a collection of interdisciplinary research into childhood throughout the Middle Ages. Contributors to the volume investigate childhood from Greece to the “Celtic-Fringe,” looking at how children lived, suffered, thrived, or died young. Scholars from myriad disciplines, from art and archaeology to history and literature, offer essays on abandonment and abuse, fosterage and guardianship, criminal behavior and child-rearing, child bishops and sainthood, disabilities and miracles, and a wide variety of other subjects related to medieval children. The volume focuses especially on children in the realms of religion, law, and vulnerabilities.
Contributors are Paul A. Broyles, Sarah Croix, Gavin Fort, Sophia Germanidou, Danielle Griego, Máire Johnson, Daniel T. Kline, Jenni Kuuliala, Lahney Preston-Matto, Melissa Raine, Eve Salisbury, Ruth Salter, Bridgette Slavin, and Mary A. Valante.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Southern Hauran]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Southern Hauran), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, is the product of studying 65 ancient sites in Southern Hauran. It focuses on the archeological and architectural heritage and presents detailed drawings of plans; restoration of buildings; and photographs of monuments, inscriptions and sculptures. The book covers the late pre-historic, Nabataean, Roman, Christian, and early Islamic periods (1st century B.C.E.- 7th century C.E.).
Many of the monuments described by Butler have long since disappeared or been destroyed, so this book provides an invaluable, thorough, detailed, and photographic documentation of the archeological treasure in Syria, the cradle of civilizations, particularly in view of the current pressing need for development and investment there.

يعد كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جنوب حوران)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، ثمرة دراسة 65 موقعًا أثريًا قديمًا في جنوب حوران. ويتناول الكتاب دراسة تراث الفن الأثري والمعماري ويعرض رسمًا مفصلًا للمخططات وترميمًا للمباني وتصويرًا للصروح الأثرية والنقوش والمنحوتات. كما يغطي الكتاب أواخر عصور ما قبل التاريخ والفترة النبطية والرومانية والمسيحية ومطلع الحقبة الإسلامية، في فترة تمتد بين القرن الأول قبل الميلاد ومطلع القرن السابع الميلادي.
لقد اختفت العديد من المعالم الأثرية التي صورها باتلر منذ أمد بعيد أو دمرت، لذلك يقدم هذا الكتاب توثيقًا مصورًا لا يقدر بثمن ويعد الأكثر شمولًا ودقة عن الكنوز الأثرية الثمينة في سوريا مهد الحضارات، لا سيما في ظل الحاجة الملحّة الآن لتنشيط مشاريع التنمية وخلق فرص الاستثمار فيها.
SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism explores how a range of cults and rituals were perceived and experienced by participants through one or more senses.

The present collection brings together papers from an international group of researchers all inspired by ‘the sensory turn’. Focusing on a wide range of ritual traditions from around the ancient Roman world, they explore the many ways in which smell and taste, sight and sound, separately and together, involved participants in religious performance. Music, incense, images and colors, contrasts of light and dark played as great a role as belief or observance in generating religious experience.

Together they contribute to an original understanding of the Roman sensory universe, and add an embodied perspective to the notion of Lived Ancient Religion.

Contributors are Martin Devecka; Visa Helenius; Yulia Ustinova; Attilio Mastrocinque; Maik Patzelt; Mark Bradley; Adeline Grand-Clément; Rocío Gordillo Hervás; Rebeca Rubio; Elena Muñiz Grijalvo; David Espinosa-Espinosa; A. César González-García, Marco V. García-Quintela; Jörg Rüpke; Rosa Sierra del Molino; Israel Campos Méndez; Valentino Gasparini; Nicole Belayche; Antón Alvar Nuño; Jaime Alvar Ezquerra; Clelia Martínez Maza.