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In what ways did Qing gentry women’s concern for gender and social propriety shape their assertions of female subjectivity and agency? How did they exploit the state promotion of female virtue and Confucian morality for self-fulfillment?
With a focus on three of the most widely acclaimed mid-Qing women authors, this book uses both synchronic and diachronic approaches to analyze writings on conjugal love, widowhood, women’s education, maternal teaching, boudoir objects, and history, illustrating their vibrant, gendered revision of literati poetic convention, thus proposing an alternative analytical framework that goes beyond the rigid dichotomy of compliance versus resistance.
Among the longest continuously performed dramatic forms in the world, nō and kyōgen have a wealth of connections to Japanese culture more broadly construed. The current book brings together under one cover the most important elements of the history and culture of the two arts, profiting from the research of both Japanese and non-Japanese scholars, and offering many new insights.
It takes a more ambitious view of nō and kyōgen than previous studies and represents the achievements of a diverse range of scholars from a broad range of disciplines.
Toward an Anthropological History of Emotion and Its Social Management
This multi-contributor volume examines the evolving relationship between fear, heterodoxy and crime in traditional China. It throws light on how these three variously interwoven elements shaped local policies and people’s perceptions of the religious, ethnic, and cultural “other.”
Authors depart from the assumption that “otherness” is constructed, stereotyped and formalized within the moral, political and legal institutions of Chinese society. The capacity of their findings to address questions about the emotional dimension of mass mobilization, the socio-political implications of heterodoxy, and attributions of crime is the result of integrating multiple sources of knowledge from history, religious studies and social science.
Contributors are Ágnes Birtalan, Ayumu Doi, Fabian Graham, Hung Tak Wai, Jing Li, Hang Lin, Tommaso Previato, and Noriko Unno.
Korean Sinitic Poetry from Ancient Times to 1945: Si in the East offers a ground-breaking introduction to the oral performative aspect of Korean Sinitic poetry (hansi 漢詩). The anthology introduces 51 representative works of Korean Sinitic poetry from the 9th to early 20th century including 9 by women poets.
Each poem is discussed with ample notes on allusions and expressions, sounds and verbal glossing (hyŏnt’o), and commentaries that look beyond the geographical boundary of Korea.
Overview essays offer cultural and literary history in a broader East Asian context, and detailed linguistic guides emphasize the musicality and orality of this treasured literary tradition.
Free access
In: Journal of Chinese Humanities
In: Journal of Chinese Humanities
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Abstract

The publication of The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature in 2010 stands as a significant achievement in the field of Chinese literary studies within the global field of Sinology. This groundbreaking work challenged the prevailing narratives of Chinese literary history in two key areas: writing style and perspectives of literary history. By employing updated methodologies, the authors addressed the practical question of how to effectively rewrite Chinese literary history. Additionally, they relied on historiographic principles to reconsider the theoretical issues surrounding the nature of Chinese literary history and the reasons behind its rewriting. Through a comprehensive investigation, this literary history offers a theoretical response to the question of what Chinese literary history truly entails. It sheds light on two fundamental compilation principles: the history of history and the history of literary culture. These principles revolve around the three core elements of history, literature, and China itself. By examining the book’s interactions with the mainstream Western theoretical community, insight may be gained into the motivations behind the writing process and the paradigmatic shifts within contemporary overseas Chinese literary history.

Open Access
In: Journal of Chinese Humanities
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Abstract

In the study of literary history, how can we transcend the traditional models found in existing works? How can we take literary history research in new directions? For scholars of literary history who aspire to break new ground in the field, these are questions that must be properly considered. Published outside of China, The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature offers us a paradigm for literary history writing. While some of its features might be debatable, it offers much inspiration and food for thought. In this case study, the author shares with our readers some of his insights and opinions regarding the study of literary history.

Open Access
In: Journal of Chinese Humanities
Author:

Abstract

The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature is based on a “history of literary culture” approach that differs clearly from the standard literary-historical narrative favored by most Chinese scholars. The conventional approach to literary history tends to focus on the most engaging elements of a literary canon, while the history of literary culture model attempts to study literary texts in conjunction with their historical contexts. Based on historical documentation, this approach seeks to rehabilitate literary works that have been misinterpreted over time. With this approach, both texts and contexts are at the heart of literary history. If literary texts are restored to the context of their literary production, we are asked to reconsider the following three important research questions. Where did the texts originate? Why were they selected as part of the literary canon? What are their special characteristics and how are they related to other texts? Answers to these questions make literary research more varied and three-dimensional. In terms of theory, the contributors to The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature clearly aspire towards historicism. In their own writing, however, they seem willing to compromise and follow “a middle way” between conventional and alternative narratives of Chinese literary history.