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Getting a doctorate in Europe is supremely attractive for young Catholic priests from developing countries. They attain prestige, career advancement, and – in many cases – the opportunity to move permanently from impoverished countries to some of the world’s wealthiest. But do they submit rigorous, original doctoral research in keeping with universal academic standards? This study examines theological dissertations by international students accepted by major Austrian universities and shows that academic incompetence, plagiarism, and negligent supervision are seriously damaging theological institutions – in Europe and abroad. By looking the other way, advisors and administrators do their students and the church a disservice.
The Case of Polish Female Converts to Islam
This is the first systematic study of conversion to Islam among Polish women in English. This book offers insights about lived realities of female Polish converts, many of whom develop cosmopolitan identities and reside in the UK. Through interviews with Polish female converts to Islam and ethnographic observation we learn about their way to Islam in a country where Muslims constitute less than 0,5% of the population and daily struggles related to maintaining their national and religious identities considered to be spoiled by many.
A History of the Okanisi Maroons in Suriname
Once the Maroons escaped from slavery and established their communities in the remote interior of Suriname, attention shifted from military threat to internal danger. As they faced these dangers in an unknown rainforest, they sought refuge in prophetic movements directed by charismatic religious leaders.
This book charts the history of Okanisi religious movements from their escape to the present day. It is based on sixty years of fieldwork by the late Bonno Thoden van Velzen and Ineke van Wetering, archival research and oral histories. Prophets of Doom is a tribute to Okanisi society and reflects decades of research and dedication.
Interreligious Dialogue, Agreements, and Toleration in 16th–18th Century Eastern Europe
Searching for Compromise? is a collection of articles researching the issues of toleration, interreligious peace and models of living together in a religiously diverse Central and Eastern Europe during the Early Modern period.

By studying theologians, legal cases, literature, individuals, and congregations this volume brings forth unique local dynamics in Central and Eastern Europe. Scholars and researchers will find these issues explored from the perspectives of diverse groups of Christians such as Catholics, Hussies, Bohemian Brethren, Old Believers, Eastern Orthodox, Lutherans, Calvinists, Moravians and Unitarians. The volume is a much-needed addition to the scholarly books written on these issues from the Western European perspective.

Contributors are Kazimierz Bem, Wolfgang Breul, Jan Červenka, Sławomir Kościelak, Melchior Jakubowski, Bryan D. Kozik, Uladzimir Padalinski, Maciej Ptaszyński, Luise Schorn-Schütte, Alexander Schunka, Paul Shore, Stephan Steiner, Bogumił Szady, and Christopher Voigt-Goy.
Volume Editors: Dustin J. Byrd and Seyed Javad Miri
Known for his most famous works, such as The Myth of the Lazy Native (1977) and The Problem of Corruption (1986), as well as his concept of the “captive mind,” Syed Hussein Alatas (1928-2007) has made significant contributions to decolonization theory, social theory, and other forms of thought critical of the current neo-colonial and neoliberal world. Although Edward Said acknowledged his debt to Syed Hussein Alatas’ work, especially its influence on Edward W. Said’s most famous book, Orientalism, Syed Hussein Alatas’ work has long been overlooked by Western academia, trapped in its Eurocentric perspective. Spurred by the commitment to continue the development of Syed Hussein Alatas’ work, this edited volume attempts to demonstrate the relevance of Syed Hussein Alatas to numerous academic fields, and the potential for his thought to be transformative in the international socio-political realm. Twenty-one authors from various disciplines and countries have contributed to Syed Hussein Alatas and Critical Social Theory: Decolonizing the Captive Mind, in the hopes of bringing his work to the forefront of social and political theory.

Contributors are: Mona Abaza, Joseph Alagha, Masturah Alatas, Sharifah Munirah Alatas, Syed Farid Alatas, Syed Imad Alatas, Hira Amin, Dustin J. Byrd, Karim Douglas Crow, Zawawi Ibrahim, N. Jayaram, Habibul Haque Khondker, Teo Lee Ken, Victor T. King, João Marcelo E. Maia, Seyed Javad Miri, Carimo Mohomed, Chandra Muzaffar, Norshahril Saat, Mostafa Soueid, and Esmaeil Zeiny.