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Abstract

This article examines how religious diversity is manifested and represented in contexts undergoing intense urban pressures. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in the Raval quarter of Barcelona, we analyse the open-air festivities of religious minorities and the emergence of new neighbourhood associations’ mobilizations. Specifically, we focus on the role of food in these events as a way to explore how diversification and urban transformation interrelate. Whilst food becomes the means through which religious and secular actors interact and articulate forms of place-making, it also becomes a resource to present religion in forms deemed ‘acceptable’ to the general public.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe
Free access
In: International Journal of Islam in Asia
Author:

Abstract

This paper argues that in late imperial China, leaders of mosques and Muslim communities underwent a secularizing process, shifting from traditional spiritual leaders to social and political Muslim elites in the mainstream Chinese society. Instead of causing a decline of Islam, the process produced seemingly contradictory outcomes. On the one hand, Muslims came to embrace Chinese political ideology and apparatus. On the other hand, mosques and Islamic education flourished in China. Secularization in this case was a “reconfiguration” of Islam – a strategy of Muslims to incorporate themselves into the Chinese polity and society without losing their Islamic features.

In: International Journal of Islam in Asia
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Abstract

Islam’s influence in nationalism and political legitimacy is frequently studied, but diversity across the umma warrants continued investigation into how Islamic tradition shapes its style, content, and potency. Investigating the discourse of 1980s Mindanao’s Moro Islamic Liberation Front, this article adopts a syncretic approach for understanding encounters between Islamic traditions, particularly jihad, and nationalist symbols. Through discourse analysis, this article creates a textured understanding of the power of Islamic-nationalism, focusing on both intellectual genealogy and textual practice. It concludes that in this instance, Islamic-nationalism can be an inherently legitimising phenomenon, animated by the uniquely moral, temporal drive of jihadi tradition.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Islam in Asia
Author:

Abstract

Different disconnected stories have been associated with the origins of Islam in the Philippines, enforcing historical narratives that have avoid placing the lens on other facts. The story of Princess Urduja that Ibn Baṭṭūṭa included in his Riḥla, dominated the ethos of an Edenic past with Arabic connections. The Spanish concept of Reconquista and the articulation of the so-called ‘Moro Wars’ pervaded ad nauseam the Moro condition and the Philippine national construction. The presence of Alexander the Great in Philippine silsilas have certainly received unequal attention, without going further than folklore. This paper aims to clarify myth and history in narrating the origins of Islam in the Philippines. In doing so recent historiographical trends and insights on Islamic mission in early modern Philippines are examined.

In: International Journal of Islam in Asia
Author:

Abstract

During the last few decades, Muslim communities in China have experienced a religious revival in which belonging to a global Muslim community has been a central element. At the same time, in recent years, the State’s campaign of Sinicization of Islam (yisilan zhongguohua) has supported Chinese nationalism and targeted symbols of Islam that are alleged to distance the believers from patriotism.

This study explores the capacity for texts, language, and visual choices to build and shape sociality and forms of devotion and to reflect social and political changes.

The research examines visual posting on the multipurpose app Weixin (WeChat), providing insights into local forms of religiousness, self-representation, and aspirational identities of part of the Muslim community in Xining (Qinghai province, Northwest China).

Open Access
In: International Journal of Islam in Asia
Approches nouvelles de la violence et de la démocratie
L’islam ouest-africain compte plusieurs confréries soufies notamment au Nord-Nigeria, au Niger et au Sénégal, des pays où la Tijāniyya occupe une place importante dans la sphère publique. Dans la première partie de ce livre, par une perspective comparatiste utilisant les concepts de démocratie, de laïcité, de domination et de violence, l’auteur montre comment ceux-ci sont déployés au niveau local surtout dans le champ politique sénégalais. Dans une deuxième, il s’engage dans un décryptage des relations complexes entre religion et politique dans le Sénégal des deux régimes d’alternance, utilisant alors une approche bourdieusienne de la domination. Mais des marabouts interviennent aussi pour arrêter les projets de personnalisation du pouvoir central. Leur intervention politique sous forme d’appel à la non-violence parvient jusque-là à stabiliser le Sénégal.

West African Islam has several Sufi orders, particularly in Northern Nigeria, Niger and Senegal, countries where the Tijāniyya occupies an important place in the public sphere. In the first part of this book, through a comparative perspective therefore using the concepts of democracy, secularism, domination and violence, the author depicts how these categories are exercised at the local level, especially in the political field. In the second part, he engages in deciphering the complex relations between religion and politics in the so-called alternance regimes between 2000 and 2020, using a Bourdieusian approach to domination. But marabouts intervene also to stop the projects of personalization of the central power. The author concludes that there is a new form of community democracy that Sufi guides use to politically stabilize Senegal.
In: Sciences et confréries soufies au Sénégal
In: Sciences et confréries soufies au Sénégal
In: Sciences et confréries soufies au Sénégal