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In: Pro domo

Abstract

This chapter presents a philosophical view to the concept of boredom [Langeweile] from its forms (bored for …, bored in …, one gets bored) and structural modes (leaving voids and postponing), worked by Martin Heidegger in his classes at the University of Freiburg during the winter semesters of 1929 and 1930. It is intended to rescue a marginal philosophical stance to the traditional positions of Heideggerian thought, being able, in the proposed hermeneutic-phenomenological transit, to interweave their philosophical images with cinematographic narratives that enrich the real understanding of the modernity. We assume boredom and its essence, Langweiligkeit, as the fundamental mood [Grundstimmung] of our era, allowing other mobility of thought to study the phenomena of cultural entertainment as a symptom of the modern disease by distancing the Dasein of the meeting, interrogation, and self-care.

In: The Culture of Boredom

Abstract

This chapter presents a philosophical view to the concept of boredom [Langeweile] from its forms (bored for …, bored in …, one gets bored) and structural modes (leaving voids and postponing), worked by Martin Heidegger in his classes at the University of Freiburg during the winter semesters of 1929 and 1930. It is intended to rescue a marginal philosophical stance to the traditional positions of Heideggerian thought, being able, in the proposed hermeneutic-phenomenological transit, to interweave their philosophical images with cinematographic narratives that enrich the real understanding of the modernity. We assume boredom and its essence, Langweiligkeit, as the fundamental mood [Grundstimmung] of our era, allowing other mobility of thought to study the phenomena of cultural entertainment as a symptom of the modern disease by distancing the Dasein of the meeting, interrogation, and self-care.

In: The Culture of Boredom
Chapter 12 Aesthetic Experiences and Dewey’s Descendants
Author:

Abstract

This chapter examines the influence of Dewey’s Art as Experience on 21st century urban teacher education by tracing its themes related to the importance of engagement with works of art in educational contexts through the work of Maxine Greene and Louise Rosenblatt and applying the teachings of these three philosophers in English education teaching methods courses. As Dewey speaks of the nature of perception in the context of having an aesthetic experience, he addresses the need for active engagement in response to works of art. Both Greene and Rosenblatt take up this concept—Greene through art-making as a kind of apprenticeship that opens up learners’ imaginations and allows them to understand the process artists undergo in bringing ideas into the world of concrete reality; and Rosenblatt, through her discussion of the transactional nature of reading literature (which can be extrapolated to other art forms).

I specifically address the use of ekphrastic poetry in a graduate English class taken by first and second year middle and high school English teachers in a graduate program in English education, and include examples of students’ poems and their reflections on their processes and implications for their own teaching practices. The chapter also discusses the process of developing experiences with an intention to help teachers enhance both their content knowledge and their ability to engage their middle and high school students by offering opportunities for creative expression that fosters voice and a sense of agency.

In: Imagining Dewey
Chapter 18 Aesthetic Experiences of Making with Paper

Abstract

Artists bring heightened awareness of sensation and material qualities in the experience of making. In this chapter, I portray the sensate experience of making with paper spurred by artists as embedded living installations in The Corner—a play/making space for under eight year olds in the State Library of Queensland, Australia. I look closely at the experience of making as inherently connected to aesthetics (); in particular making with paper. Three artists make with paper on different days. Each brings different insights of the sensuous qualities and making capacities of paper.

Children and their families make with the artists. Intense focus is experienced. The unlimited possibilities of paper come to be known in a library—a place of books—preserved entities made of paper; yet, in The Corner of the library, paper can be reconfigured—is reconfigured—opening up the wonder of the aesthetic experience of mattering, imagining, and making with paper. Attention to sensation, matter and making were gathered through sensory ethnography (Pink, 2015), aesthetic sensibilities and understanding of the vibrancy of matter (). Performative accounts of artist making experiences with paper are shared to glean what happens in the experiences of making; what we come to sense, to know, to be and connect across generations and communities. Material literacies unfold.

In: Imagining Dewey
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Chapter 4 The Aesthetics of Rehearsal
Author:

Abstract

This chapter considers conceptions of music and their relation to rehearsal and then considers music and rehearsal in the context of Dewey’s Art as Experience. For Dewey, music is not a score or an ideal performance, it is an actual performance that unifies the score, performers, & audience in an aesthetic experience. It is argued that rehearsals are also aesthetic experiences and that the aesthetic quality of the rehearsal affects both present experience and the production of future aesthetic experiences. I take as a case study a series of rehearsals and performances of John Adams’s opera, Nixon in China. Rehearsals are part of the process of gaining control over the materials and resources of production. This process is not only technical practice, but also involves achieving qualities of a performance as an aesthetic experience complete in itself.

In: Imagining Dewey
When does eating become art? This book answers this question by exploring the position of taste in contemporary culture and the manners in which taste meanders its way into the realm of art. The argument identifies aesthetic values not only in artistic practices, where they are naturally expected, but also in the spaces of everydayness that seem far removed from the domain of fine arts. As such, it seeks to grasp what the artists who offer aesthetic experiences combined with culinary experiences actually seek to communicate, as well as pondering whether a cook can be an artist.

Abstract

This essay examines Queen Christina of Sweden’s material response to accusations of barbarism by establishing that her collections of antique sculpture acted as artistic and intellectual foils to her detractors. The goal is to situate Christina’s development of a classicized persona within existing scholarship about the queen as a collector and patron, thereby illustrating its impact on her decision to build one of the largest collections of ancient Roman antiquities amassed by an early modern woman. This is accomplished by identifying key themes such as knowledge and rulership that formed the queen’s public persona and were projected to visitors through her display-spaces. To help understand why specific imagery related to these themes appears repeatedly in her suite of antiquities, allegorical emblems associated with Christina are contextualized as reflections of early modern intellectual movements that entwined Gothicism with Swedish history. Like her sculptural displays, these movements creatively inserted Scandinavia, and by extension Christina, into the Greco-Roman tradition.

In: Visualizing the Past in Italian Renaissance Art 
In: Quid est sacramentum?