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Abstract

This article critiques anthropological approaches such as Victor Turner’s and his epigones that reduce objects to sets of meanings, functions and attributes either located in-between matter and reality or in some liminal realm. I borrow from my ethnographic encounters among the Shia nonstate armed combatants in the Middle East since 2007 and especially focus on nonideological/nonreligious elements of conflict such as materiality of combat, material expressions of violence, and pain and pleasure, to find a fresh location for the so-called in-between that upends dualities and dichotomies without compromising on how human and nonhuman relate, how they co-constitute realities and become religious through meanings and representations. By way of guns, martyrdom, and religion, this article pays attention to religion without centering religiosity, religious practices, and religion. Instead, it follows how things gather around religion without becoming religious. In other words, I follow how things of conflict relate to religion, shape religiosity, and collaborate with believers. This is an intentional academic choice, namely, to talk about religion without engaging with religion explicitly to highlight nonhuman partners in religiously framed political violence. I propose a deeper engagement with conflict cosmologies beyond anthropological methodological routines which limit objects to a bundle of qualities both in appearances and meanings or overspreading objects to the sum of their relationships, like Actor Network Theory.

Open Access
In: Material Perspectives on Religion, Conflict, and Violence

Abstract

In this chapter, a summarizing historical outline is given, including examples, of how normal alcohol use and pathological addiction has been construed and how these ideas have shifted within psychiatric terminology between the beginning of the twentieth and twenty-first century. The examples of ideological heritage within the addiction concept, principally within a psychiatric diagnostic context in Sweden, a focus on stable vs. unstable conceptions of alcohol use patterns (i.e. how much/how often) and their functional effects. Also, since ideas of when alcohol use becomes pathological addiction have been influenced by the spatial and temporal circumstances, stable and instable ideas over time regarding where and when alcohol consumption is considered normal vs. pathological has been related to changes in the psychiatric addiction concept. Awareness of these issues are important for clinicians and researchers within the addiction-field today so that contextual moral values do not influence psychiatric diagnostics in a biased manner.

In: Negotiating Institutional Heritage and Wellbeing
In: Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art
In: The Paper Trade in Early Modern Europe
Open Access
In: Material Perspectives on Religion, Conflict, and Violence
In: All Things Arabia
In: All Things Arabia
In: Conceptualism and Materiality
Author:

Abstract

This chapter presents Iron Age II anthropomorphic terracotta figurines found in Phoenicia and briefly discusses their iconography and distribution. Second, this contribution aims to distinguish the Iron Age II terracotta figurines from the older Iron Age I types and the younger Achaemenid ones.

In: Iron Age Terracotta Figurines from the Southern Levant in Context
Author:

Abstract

This chapter presents Iron Age II anthropomorphic terracotta figurines found in Phoenicia and briefly discusses their iconography and distribution. Second, this contribution aims to distinguish the Iron Age II terracotta figurines from the older Iron Age I types and the younger Achaemenid ones.

In: Iron Age Terracotta Figurines from the Southern Levant in Context