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In: Higher Education in the Next Decade
In: Decolonizing Global Citizenship Education
In: Decolonizing Global Citizenship Education
In: Neoliberalizing Educational Reform
In: Neoliberalizing Educational Reform

Abstract

Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), through five decades of academic standing since 1969, has embodied knowledge democracy into its university-community engagement. Here, we feature USM’s relevant foundations, notable accomplishments and aspired trajectory in upholding social responsibility and sustainable development as tools for meaningful change, with and for, the society.

Open Access
In: Socially Responsible Higher Education

Abstract

The issue of student fees became controversial in Germany following the introduction of tuition fees in seven of the 16 federal states beginning in 2006. This resulted in resistance and protest movements among students. The author describes his experience as the President of the University of Bielefeld during this period. Student protests and activism, and their support by the majority of the public, resulted in the abolition of tuition fees in all seven of the states by 2013/2014. The author concludes with a discussion of the arguments for and against tuition fees that were raised before and during the tuition fees controversy in Germany, and the various factors that affected the course of events during this period.

In: Preparing Students for Life and Work

Abstract

Higher Education in Canada began in the late 1700s with the establishment of the first universities in Quebec and New Brunswick (). While these institutions were often built upon unceded Aboriginal lands, Aboriginal peoples’ participation in higher education did not begin until the late 1960s. There were a few early participants (e.g., post wwii) but participation at that time meant giving up one’s status as a First Nations person. This act of assimilation occurred in Canada throughout its educational systems’ policies and practices (e.g., residential schools and day schools for K-12). The participation shift that took hold in the late 1960s and 1970s was due to several factors including: development of Aboriginal specific programs and services; establishment of Aboriginal post-secondary funding programs; and increased high school completion rates. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the policy, program, and practice changes that have resulted in slowly transforming Canada’s higher education system from a tool of assimilation to one of Indigenous empowerment and decolonization. The chapter will explore ideas of what the purpose of higher education is in relation to Indigenous understandings of life, work, and civic engagement.

In: Preparing Students for Life and Work
In: Global Knowledge Cultures
In: Global Knowledge Cultures