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This essay examines the correspondence between Beckett and Duthuit in the light of the unpublished notes that Beckett took in Germany in 1936-37. The underlying issue that Beckett's reflections on the image seems to address is the reorientation of his creative writing and the development of a new aesthetic. There is, when Beckett is confronted to an image, a double movement that can be discerned in the way he beholds the image, of fascination, first, but also of mistrust towards this painting. In stripping paintings of their narrative of fIgurative intention, Beckett's comments seem to aim at a situation of mankind in the world, apprehended outside of all preoccupations with its causes or as the effect of an absent cause.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

In , the apparent circular confinement of discourse opens up and overflows: outside of space, outside of time. Beyond anxiety, every reader or spectator of passes through this erotization of limits. In order to read this text we must continuously replay the drama of separation, 'be in transit' (in several meanings of the term) in a temporary location, a location without a location. If the modern tendency, as Deleuze suggests, is to include the outside 'within' the world and not without, in a world beyond, Beckett's mad topologies perhaps are attempts at inventing the writing of another form of (atheistic? sacred?) infinity.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author:

Act without Words I is a play about gravity, whose mechanisms are on display. In Worstward Ho, the image of an old man and a child holding hands suddenly appears out of the nothingness. This image, with all its implications, has given rise to our recent production of Act without Words I , in which the same sequence of movements is performed twice, first by a young circus artist, and then by myself, an eighty-year-old dancer.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Author:

As Lee Edelman has shown, the child has become a privileged signifier in political discourse of a belief in the future as such, a phenomenon he terms “reproductive futurism.” Here, the figure of the child in the works of W. B. Yeats and Samuel Beckett is read in the light of a divisive politics of fertility in Ireland that was symptomatic of the broader struggle over Ireland's future. Reading and “A Prayer for my Daughter,” I argue that whereas Yeats's antinationalism sponsored a pronatalism that invokes the child as signifier of a reinvigorated Protestant ascendancy, Beckett was both antinationalist and antinatalist, rejecting pronatalism and any possible future the child may signify.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Tricks with a Glass