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Abstract

A sense of belonging or connection to others has been seen as a fundamental need by social scientists across time. This connection to others leads to positive outcomes in almost every domain and sport is no exception to this rule. In the world of team sports, connecting to others has a huge impact on both performance and satisfaction and is essential for success. The following paper will discuss: the roots of the concept of belonging; the application of belonging to sport; a potential framework for understanding individual and environmental factors of belonging; implications of the impact of belonging for athletes.

In: Journal of Belonging and Human Connection
In: Multilingualism and the Role of Sibling Order
Author:
The situation of young people in Europe has been significantly impacted by recent changes that have taken place in the job market. Young people’s life trajectories and transitions to adulthood are increasingly less linear, more segmented, and more reversible, with a rise in unemployment and the NEET (Not in Education, Employment or Training) phenomenon. This book aims to investigate the youth policies implemented in Europe and how they are integrated in the socio-economic contexts of the various member states and their welfare regimes, educational systems, and skills markets.

A significant number of young adults neither study nor work, and live in a constant state of discouragement and inactivity, giving up on their search for job opportunities. The strategic choices implemented at the European level in response to this problem promote ALMPs (Active Labour Market Policies), including the creation of the Youth Guarantee Program, which is examined here both at the European level and, specifically, in the Italian context.
In: Multilingualism and the Role of Sibling Order
A sense of belonging is a fundamental human need. Alarmingly, research tells us that a significant portion of the population feel lonely and like they don’t belong. Loneliness has become an epidemic and people in adolescence and old age groups are at risk. Having a sense of belonging has widespread physiological and psychological benefits, with positive outcomes that transcend the lifespan, and possibly generations. The need to belong is common for all people irrespective of culture, race, ethnicity, geography, or location.

The aim of this journal is to present contemporary research on belonging, human connection and loneliness and draw together transdisciplinary approaches and theoretical orientations to address a burgeoning issue of our time. A secondary aim of the journal is to highlight how detrimental a lack of belonging is for psychological and physical functioning. The Journal of Belonging and Human Connection (JBHC) is a direct response to a critical issue and seeks to provide a platform for which we can begin to address it.

For questions and/or submissions please contact the Editors-in-Chief Kelly-Ann Allen or Christopher Boyle.
Based on a multi-year ethnography in one Spanish-speaking community in New Jersey, this book is a meticulous account of six Mexican families that explores the relationship between siblings’ language use patterns, practices, and ideologies. Combining insights gained from language socialization and heritage language studies within the larger field of sociolinguistics, the book’s findings examine siblings’ sociolinguistic environments and the ways in which these Latino children use and view their multilingual resources in the home, school, and broader community. This study emphasizes the links between siblings’ language ideologies, agentive decision making, and linguistic patterns, and the ways in which birth order influences the different dimensions of heritage language maintenance in the U.S..
In: Multilingualism and the Role of Sibling Order

RETRACTION NOTICE


The Publisher notifies the readers that Voices of Social Justice and Diversity in a Hawai’i Context: Grandparents, Grandchildren, Schools, Communities, and Churches, edited by Amarjit Singh, M. Luafata Simanu-Klutz and Mike Devine, published in print in hardback, paperback and electronically on September 26, 2019, has been retracted as of March 12, 2020. On December 23, 2019, the Human Studies Program (HSP) of the University of Hawai’i (UH) notified the Publisher about alleged research misconduct by one of the editors and that a for-cause audit had been initiated on December 11, 2019. On February 27, 2020, the UH HSP shared the audit’s findings with the Publisher. The UH Social & Behavorial Institutional Review Board (IRB) identified research protocol violations by two of the editors, which constitute Serious Non-Compliance. Based on the audit’s findings, the Publisher has decided to withdraw both print and electronic versions of the book out of consideration for the research subjects and in view of irregularities identified by IRB.

This book presents nuanced small-scale studies and reflective essays, and is about voices of contemporary grandparents and grandchildren living in the State of Hawai'i which is rapidly going through economic, social, educational, and cultural transformation ushered in by forces of globalization and McDonaldization of society.

Hawai‘i is generally known as a great tourist destination that is no less than an imagined paradise. Hawai‘i is more than solely a site for tourism; it has a culturally and socially diverse population, and has a contested social history. In this context, in a deeper sense, the book gives the reader glimpses of family members at the level of intimacy among themselves in their place based situated interactions in today’s Hawai‘i. In its real essence, this book is an authentic collection of research papers, short stories, anecdotes, memories and reminiscences; of aloha (love, compassion, kindness) and mahalo (thanks, respect, and praise); of longing and search for legacy by diasporic elders, immigrants, settlers, American citizens, hyphenated Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders; by grandparents and grandchildren of diverse and multiple ethnicities, cultures, and races who have struggled hard through many decades to make Hawai‘i their permanent and beloved home and place, or long-term residence to live and raise their families.

The set of self-narratives in this book may have significant implications for understanding the process of aging in the State of Hawai'i; for social aging is both an individual and a social process in the sense that an individual’s biography is intimately related to her/his society’s biography. For “doing” roles such as being grandparents and grandchildren are heavily defined and structured by prevailing social and cultural processes.

The book may be useful for educators and students who are working and studying in areas such as education, sociology of family, social work, local and global social change, indigenous cultures and societies, alternative modernities and indigenizing social movements, race and ethnic relations, settler societies, social justice, health care, social gerontology, diaspora and immigration studies, and those working with youth in communities.

In: [RETRACTED] Voices of Social Justice and Diversity in a Hawai‘i Context
In: Multilingualism and the Role of Sibling Order