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Currently, the report-based monitoring system of the crc provides a wealth of qualitative information about country performance, but not in a form that is frequently updated, easily analysable and comparable across countries and over time. To date, a broad range of quantitatively comparable indicators of laws and policies relevant to the crc have not been widely available. Through the world Policy Analysis Center, we have collected and analysed primary legislative texts, international reports and other sources to create such indicators for all States Parties. In this article, we draw on this new data set to propose a complementary approach to monitoring progress on crc obligations using quantitatively analysable indicators of law and policy, and operationalise a sample set of indicators to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this approach in assessing country action on children’s rights and compliance with the crc.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

The potential of the coroner’s office in Ontario to reduce the incidents of child maltreatment-related fatalities is assessed through an examination of the four inquests completed between 2000 and 2015 involving the deaths of children connected with the child welfare system. Applying a human rights perspective rooted in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, it is argued that a concern for the fundamental legal entitlements of children has been little in evidence at the inquests of child fatalities, detracting from the ability of these proceedings to contribute to the prevention of maltreatment-related child deaths. Data derived from the juries’ verdicts at these inquests are compared with the rights and principles prescribed in the Convention with a view to assessing the extent to which the latter are implicated in the former. Findings of note include the absence of a simple instance in which the Convention or its provisions were explicitly referenced in the inquest verdicts, a startling fact given Canada’s obligations under international law to a treaty dedicated to the preservation of the life and wellbeing of children.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

Children’s engagement with online technologies may seem second nature, yet the impact that the Internet has on their lives is shaped by a powerful public policy agenda that largely overlooks children’s interests. Australia’s digital policy framework is dominated by discourses of safety and risk on the one hand and, on the other, neoliberal arguments about the possibilities for economic growth offered by e-commerce. In the midst of such powerful discourses it is difficult for children’s voices to be heard. This paper offers a close textual analysis of the Australian public policy context for regulating cyberspace. Finding a discursive duopoly that overlooks children’s interests, the author identifies two key features of a rights-based approach to challenge the dominant narratives currently serving the interests of the private sector and the State.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights