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In: Crossing Cultural Boundaries in East Asia and Beyond
In: Asian Medicine
Author: Daniel Milne

Abstract

Tourism is a nexus for movement across, and the blurring of, national, cultural, linguistic and imaginative boundaries. Diverse actors attempt to utilize tourism to reinforce, shape, and sometimes challenge popular concepts of these boundaries. This chapter examines three early Anglophone guidebooks about Kyoto to explore how guidebook authors of differing national backgrounds seek to mediate corporal and imaginative encounters between tourists and locals. Through analyzing and comparing guidebooks written by authors from the West and Japan, including pre-modern texts, this chapter challenges assumptions in previous research that tourist discourses of non-Western “others” are simple impositions of Western Orientalism. Further, it demonstrates that representations are not only a product of a writer’s national and cultural background, but are also influenced by the commissioning organization, anticipated audience, and local and international discourses. The study thus highlights the complexities of representation in texts that mediate the imaginative boundaries of international tourism.

In: Crossing Cultural Boundaries in East Asia and Beyond

Abstract

While modernization and globalization have been sweeping the Korean medical industry of late, a perhaps seemingly contradictory trend toward more personalized care has also been unfolding in certain circles. This is a brief case study of a traditional Korean medical doctor who integrates Western mindfulness protocols into traditional Korean psychology/psychiatry in order to provide that connection with his patients. This practice report shows that his adaptation of mindfulness represents a Korean counterappropriation of a Western clinical tool that was itself created by appropriating Buddhist techniques. It argues that the multivalent resonances with both science and Buddhist methods give mindfulness utility as a site for this doctor to hybridize different bodies of knowledge, to reinterpret traditional insights in modern idioms, and arrive at new therapeutic innovations for his patients.

In: Asian Medicine
In: Crossing Cultural Boundaries in East Asia and Beyond

Abstract

Asian Medicine is inaugurating a new type of article in this issue, the pedagogical forum. For our launch of this new format, forum editors Zanolini and Hanson invited a range of scholars and practitioners teaching East Asian medicine within diverse institutional contexts to contribute. Their different approaches to teaching can be more broadly applied to any medical tradition in Asia.

In: Asian Medicine

Abstract

Asian Medicine is inaugurating a new type of article in this issue, the book review forum. For our launch of this new format, we have invited an extended review of a recently published landmark volume in our field and a response to the review from the volume editors.

In: Asian Medicine
Author: Elena Baibikov

Abstract

The essentialist, implied equation between a territory and a culture has prevailed in anthropological discourse and in translation studies it was also common to most academic approaches. Faced with modern multiculturalism this view is no longer tenable. Unlike geographical borders, cultural ones are far from being fixed barriers and individuals, especially those who serve as cultural agents, have the power to define and re-define cultural boundaries. Following a “cultural turn” in the 1980s, translators have come to be conceptualized as agents of communicative process and cultural change, actively acting at so called cultural borders. However, little research has explored what translators themselves say about this aspect of their work and how they conceptualize their profession. This chapter focuses on literary translators, who in their intercultural encounters act as cultural communicative agents: persons who create contexts where cross-cultural contacts are highlighted or actually take place. It assesses the way translators understand and conceptualize their profession within the paradigmatic context of borders between cultures, and examines differences between the representations of conceptual and operational levels of translation.

In: Crossing Cultural Boundaries in East Asia and Beyond
In: Crossing Cultural Boundaries in East Asia and Beyond