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In: The European Union and China
In: The European Union and China

Abstract

One of the most frequently made European criticisms of China under communist rule has been of the continuing restrictions that the government places upon the freedom of expression of citizens and journalists. This study analyses Chinese journalism within an evolving political system, penetrated increasingly by Western ideas and criticisms as a result of globalisation, the opening up of the Chinese economy and the education of significant numbers of Chinese students in the West. It examines formal and informal restrictions on journalists’ freedom of expression in China. It discusses the modest expansion in their freedom of manoeuvre, as the media has been opened to market forces, and limited forms of criticism have been permitted. The study further explores Chinese views on media control in the context of both historically-rooted concerns about social stability and Communist Party ideology. The analysis concludes by discussing possible paths forward for Chinese journalism, bearing in mind the fact that the internet is likely to become increasingly difficult for the authorities to control, with both user numbers, and technological advances, increasing significantly.

In: The European Union and China

Abstract

One of the most frequently made European criticisms of China under communist rule has been of the continuing restrictions that the government places upon the freedom of expression of citizens and journalists. This study analyses Chinese journalism within an evolving political system, penetrated increasingly by Western ideas and criticisms as a result of globalisation, the opening up of the Chinese economy and the education of significant numbers of Chinese students in the West. It examines formal and informal restrictions on journalists’ freedom of expression in China. It discusses the modest expansion in their freedom of manoeuvre, as the media has been opened to market forces, and limited forms of criticism have been permitted. The study further explores Chinese views on media control in the context of both historically-rooted concerns about social stability and Communist Party ideology. The analysis concludes by discussing possible paths forward for Chinese journalism, bearing in mind the fact that the internet is likely to become increasingly difficult for the authorities to control, with both user numbers, and technological advances, increasing significantly.

In: The European Union and China
Author: Pradeep Taneja

Abstract

This chapter focuses on China’s search for energy security, especially in the oil and gas sector, and on the impact of this search on China’s relations with the European Union (EU). It places the Chinese energy security strategy within the context of the country’s economic reform program by examining the political dynamics behind developments in the energy sector. The study outlines some key initiatives China has taken to ensure regular and cost-effective oil and gas supplies. It surveys China’s energy security policy and the institutional structure which supports it. China’s search for energy security has led the PRC to develop closer political and military ties with a number of countries in Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia; Chinese state-owned oil and gas companies have invested billions of dollars in the development of energy assets there. These efforts have been backed up by Chinese civilian and military aid flows to some strife-torn countries in Africa. This is seen by many European politicians and EU officials as ‘undermining’ their efforts to improve quality of governance and respect for human rights in those countries. This chapter examines the differences between the European Union and China over the situation in the Darfur region of Sudan, a country in which China has made significant investments in nearly all aspects of the oil industry.

In: The European Union and China
Author: Pradeep Taneja

Abstract

This chapter focuses on China’s search for energy security, especially in the oil and gas sector, and on the impact of this search on China’s relations with the European Union (EU). It places the Chinese energy security strategy within the context of the country’s economic reform program by examining the political dynamics behind developments in the energy sector. The study outlines some key initiatives China has taken to ensure regular and cost-effective oil and gas supplies. It surveys China’s energy security policy and the institutional structure which supports it. China’s search for energy security has led the PRC to develop closer political and military ties with a number of countries in Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia; Chinese state-owned oil and gas companies have invested billions of dollars in the development of energy assets there. These efforts have been backed up by Chinese civilian and military aid flows to some strife-torn countries in Africa. This is seen by many European politicians and EU officials as ‘undermining’ their efforts to improve quality of governance and respect for human rights in those countries. This chapter examines the differences between the European Union and China over the situation in the Darfur region of Sudan, a country in which China has made significant investments in nearly all aspects of the oil industry.

In: The European Union and China
Author: Jenny Clegg

Abstract

The formation and development of the European Union, and the rise of China, are transforming the global order, promoting a more multi-centred world. Sino-EU relations will play a key role in shaping the character of the newly-emerging multi-polarity. In examining how China views Europe, this chapter is concerned to set out China’s strategic perspective on Europe’s role in world multi-polarisation, explaining its significance from the Chinese perspective. By improving its relations with Europe step by step, China has been able to strengthen its own status in a world order dominated by the US. The discussion opens with a consideration of China’s multi-polar conception, illuminating this further by tracing the origins of the analysis to the 1970s, to Mao Zedong’s Theory of the Three Worlds. The chapter then outlines developments in Sino-European relations in the wider context of the changing international situation, to reveal how these have helped shape China’s strategic choices. Finally, the discussion reviews recent Chinese views on relations with the EU and considers the prospects for a strengthening of Sino-EU strategic cooperation.

In: The European Union and China
Author: Jenny Clegg

Abstract

The formation and development of the European Union, and the rise of China, are transforming the global order, promoting a more multi-centred world. Sino-EU relations will play a key role in shaping the character of the newly-emerging multi-polarity. In examining how China views Europe, this chapter is concerned to set out China’s strategic perspective on Europe’s role in world multi-polarisation, explaining its significance from the Chinese perspective. By improving its relations with Europe step by step, China has been able to strengthen its own status in a world order dominated by the US. The discussion opens with a consideration of China’s multi-polar conception, illuminating this further by tracing the origins of the analysis to the 1970s, to Mao Zedong’s Theory of the Three Worlds. The chapter then outlines developments in Sino-European relations in the wider context of the changing international situation, to reveal how these have helped shape China’s strategic choices. Finally, the discussion reviews recent Chinese views on relations with the EU and considers the prospects for a strengthening of Sino-EU strategic cooperation.

In: The European Union and China
In: The European Union and China
In: The European Union and China