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Abstract

Rev Dr Andrew Evans, the former General Superintendent of the Assemblies of God in Australia (1977–1997), shocked naysayers by co-founding the Family First Party in 2001, serving as a Legislative Councillor of South Australia (2002–2008). Most narratives seek to build a genealogy linked to the “religious right” of the United States of America, discrediting other factors that may be in play. Yet, it is the specific context of Andrew Evans within Australian Pentecostalism that made this new minor party such a success. Based on oral interviews, archival research and analysis of secondary sources, this chapter argues that Evans was effective in his political career through: a politicised theological foundation; established national profile; the South Australian political climate; unique organisational structure; interdenominational and interfaith support; sophisticated preferencing; the “family values” agenda; use of an emotive discourse; and unprecedented federal support.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements

Abstract

Rev Dr Andrew Evans, the former General Superintendent of the Assemblies of God in Australia (1977–1997), shocked naysayers by co-founding the Family First Party in 2001, serving as a Legislative Councillor of South Australia (2002–2008). Most narratives seek to build a genealogy linked to the “religious right” of the United States of America, discrediting other factors that may be in play. Yet, it is the specific context of Andrew Evans within Australian Pentecostalism that made this new minor party such a success. Based on oral interviews, archival research and analysis of secondary sources, this chapter argues that Evans was effective in his political career through: a politicised theological foundation; established national profile; the South Australian political climate; unique organisational structure; interdenominational and interfaith support; sophisticated preferencing; the “family values” agenda; use of an emotive discourse; and unprecedented federal support.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements
Author: Peter Elliott

Abstract

The prevailing historiography of Australian Pentecostalism, as captured in Barry Chant’s 2011 publication, The Spirit of Pentecost: the origins and development of the Pentecostal movement in Australia 1870–1939, identifies three main formative influences on the movement. These are Wesleyanism, the Dowie movement, and evangelicalism. The 1870 date in the title refers to a small group in Portland, Victoria, which exhibited glossolalia at that time. Chant’s publication contains only one reference to the Catholic Apostolic Church, which formed in Britain in 1835, in the wake of Edward Irving’s proto-Pentecostal theology. This reference makes clear that Chant does not believe they practised glossolalia in Australia. This paper will argue that the Catholic Apostolic Church arrived in Australia in 1853 and taught and exhibited the charismatic gifts from at least the 1860s, but probably earlier. The evidence for this is to be found in contemporary newspaper accounts, but also, significantly, in the Angels’ Report Books, located in Bradford, West Yorkshire. The Bradford collection has been fully digitised and includes verbatim transcripts of prophecies and interpreted glossolalia. The Catholic Apostolic Church was an established denomination in Australia throughout the second half of the nineteenth-century, during which time they taught and practised the charismatic gifts. This evidence calls for a recognition of the role of the Catholic Apostolic Church as a significant precursor to Australian Pentecostalism.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements
Author: Peter Elliott

Abstract

The prevailing historiography of Australian Pentecostalism, as captured in Barry Chant’s 2011 publication, The Spirit of Pentecost: the origins and development of the Pentecostal movement in Australia 1870–1939, identifies three main formative influences on the movement. These are Wesleyanism, the Dowie movement, and evangelicalism. The 1870 date in the title refers to a small group in Portland, Victoria, which exhibited glossolalia at that time. Chant’s publication contains only one reference to the Catholic Apostolic Church, which formed in Britain in 1835, in the wake of Edward Irving’s proto-Pentecostal theology. This reference makes clear that Chant does not believe they practised glossolalia in Australia. This paper will argue that the Catholic Apostolic Church arrived in Australia in 1853 and taught and exhibited the charismatic gifts from at least the 1860s, but probably earlier. The evidence for this is to be found in contemporary newspaper accounts, but also, significantly, in the Angels’ Report Books, located in Bradford, West Yorkshire. The Bradford collection has been fully digitised and includes verbatim transcripts of prophecies and interpreted glossolalia. The Catholic Apostolic Church was an established denomination in Australia throughout the second half of the nineteenth-century, during which time they taught and practised the charismatic gifts. This evidence calls for a recognition of the role of the Catholic Apostolic Church as a significant precursor to Australian Pentecostalism.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements
Author: John Maiden

Abstract

The scholarly historical literature on the global Catholic Charismatic Renewal is sparse, particularly where the movement outside of the United States and its Midwest centres of South Bend and Ann Arbor is concerned. This chapter offers a case study of the CCR in the Australian city of Brisbane. Adopting a multi-scalar analysis, it examines the movement’s city-wide context, its transnational linkages with America, and its national and pan-regional connections and influence. It demonstrates the combination of local and American factors which established and shaped the movement in the city and argues that just as Brisbane CCR was shaped by globalising flows, so it also became a hub for renewal both nationally and pan-regionally. Brisbane, it concludes, had a key and largely overlooked role in the historical development of global CCR in the 1970s.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements
Author: John Maiden

Abstract

The scholarly historical literature on the global Catholic Charismatic Renewal is sparse, particularly where the movement outside of the United States and its Midwest centres of South Bend and Ann Arbor is concerned. This chapter offers a case study of the CCR in the Australian city of Brisbane. Adopting a multi-scalar analysis, it examines the movement’s city-wide context, its transnational linkages with America, and its national and pan-regional connections and influence. It demonstrates the combination of local and American factors which established and shaped the movement in the city and argues that just as Brisbane CCR was shaped by globalising flows, so it also became a hub for renewal both nationally and pan-regionally. Brisbane, it concludes, had a key and largely overlooked role in the historical development of global CCR in the 1970s.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements

Abstract

For Bundjalung Pentecostals in northern New South Wales, some personal and social issues are characterised in terms of an aggressive tension between positive and negative forces. Such forces correspond to incorporeal entities within Christian cosmology. In this chapter, I explore Bundjalung Pentecostalism; the concept of faith as battlefield is central to my analysis – from referring to scripture and oral tradition to dealing with people’s lived experience. I critically engage with earlier anthropological studies of Bundjalung Pentecostalism by Malcolm Calley (in the 1950s) and Akiko Ono (in the 2000s) and conceptualise what Calley and Ono referred to as “backsliding.” Reflecting on Søren Kierkegaard’s and Edith Stein’s theological accounts, I investigate the paradoxical essence of faith and argue that continuity of faith and healing grace is in conjunction with lived experience.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements

Abstract

For Bundjalung Pentecostals in northern New South Wales, some personal and social issues are characterised in terms of an aggressive tension between positive and negative forces. Such forces correspond to incorporeal entities within Christian cosmology. In this chapter, I explore Bundjalung Pentecostalism; the concept of faith as battlefield is central to my analysis – from referring to scripture and oral tradition to dealing with people’s lived experience. I critically engage with earlier anthropological studies of Bundjalung Pentecostalism by Malcolm Calley (in the 1950s) and Akiko Ono (in the 2000s) and conceptualise what Calley and Ono referred to as “backsliding.” Reflecting on Søren Kierkegaard’s and Edith Stein’s theological accounts, I investigate the paradoxical essence of faith and argue that continuity of faith and healing grace is in conjunction with lived experience.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements

Abstract

The epilogue by leading scholar of global Pentecostalism, Allan Anderson, locates the themes explored in the book within the larger literature on the subject. Anderson notes that Australia is both reflective of, and an active contributor to, global trends and the emergence of a century-long swing of Christianity towards the global south. Methodologically, he points out that generalizing theories about the growth and future of religion often fail to capture the theological and experiential drivers of movements such as PCCs, in which personal, heart-felt experience of God through the Spirit offered to all people without preconditions, enable them to be “powerful” and assertive in societies where they have been marginalised. Marginalized people are offered solutions to their felt needs in all their varieties, in ways which will continue to draw people to pentecostal churches. The case studies and theoretical explorations in this volume thus provide important contributions to the broader literature.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements

Abstract

The epilogue by leading scholar of global Pentecostalism, Allan Anderson, locates the themes explored in the book within the larger literature on the subject. Anderson notes that Australia is both reflective of, and an active contributor to, global trends and the emergence of a century-long swing of Christianity towards the global south. Methodologically, he points out that generalizing theories about the growth and future of religion often fail to capture the theological and experiential drivers of movements such as PCCs, in which personal, heart-felt experience of God through the Spirit offered to all people without preconditions, enable them to be “powerful” and assertive in societies where they have been marginalised. Marginalized people are offered solutions to their felt needs in all their varieties, in ways which will continue to draw people to pentecostal churches. The case studies and theoretical explorations in this volume thus provide important contributions to the broader literature.

In: Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements