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Author: Diana Amundsen

Abstract

This article explores whether digital communication technologies have applicability in reducing social isolation and loneliness among older adults. Issues of social isolation and loneliness among older adults are important as they are identified risk factors for mortality, disability, cognitive ability, depression and poor wellbeing. This problem is more urgent due to the Covid-19 pandemic which has required older adults to physically and socially distance from family, friends, neighbours, communities and health services. In the context of the present Covid-19 pandemic, this article is of interest to educators, social workers, community service providers, health service practitioners, gerontological scholars involved in preparing older adult communities for present and future traumatic events resulting in socially isolating experiences. The literature identified that use of technology to promote social connection and enhance wellbeing for older adults can be an effective intervention, but more information is needed as to what aspects of such interventions make them effective. This research advocates for improvement in wellbeing and social connectedness of older adults through consideration of interventions through a model for flourishing and wellbeing. The research contributes to our growing understanding of how to change the way we think, feel and act towards older adults, ageing and flourishing.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

covid-19 has changed the way we sing in choirs and has seen the extraordinary uptake of Zoom as a video chat platform across society. This is a reflective tale of four choirs members and their insights into how they improvised with traditional choir singing in a Zoom space. It consideres how zoom pedagogies allowed them to bridge social isolation during the pandemic. It includes the voices of the conductor; music teacher/technician; the voice of a media savvy artist choir member and finally the voice of a singing visual educator. The article embeds Deleuzoguattarian thinking. It draws on the concepts of the machinic assemblage and becoming as choir participants who embraced Zoom to facilitate song. Singing in a zoom virtual choir brings forth a burgeoning new relational way of being. To find ways to sing and imagine life and self without physical, temporal and spatial borders.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

covid-19 is an omnipresent feature of 2020, both globally and within Australia. For university students, a consequence of this has been the shift from on-campus to online delivery. Exploring these visual realities for lecturers and students, this article engages in Bakhtinian dialogism; a dialogic interaction that is born between peoples searching for meaning (). To do so, the authors engaged with and responded to students’ survey data whom they lecture and coordinate. Although the survey had limited responses, it enabled the authors to dialogue about received knowledge (istina) from students and contemplate this in relation to the authors’ own perspectives and experiences (pravda). Through this engagement, they suggest the importance of visually imbued emotive connectivity and dialogic relational care within web-conferencing, as well as didactic lecturing as valid forms of visual engagement.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Tang Wee Teo

Abstract

This paper reports on a first study about Singapore primary science teachers’ views and practices in inclusive science classrooms. Rasch analysis was performed on an online teacher survey administered to 108 teachers, which was conducted to investigate teachers’ views about students with special education needs (SEN; Construct A), self-efficacy views in teaching students with SEN (Construct B), and their science teaching practices in inclusive classrooms (Construct C). The findings show that it was generally easy for the science teachers to agree with items in Constructs B and C, but not in Construct A. A closer examination of the individual constructs revealed positive teachers’ views, their feelings of inadequacy and wish for greater school support, and selected types of accommodations and modifications practiced in their classrooms. This study contributes new insights drawn from an Asian study, offers a validated instrument, and provides science teacher educators ideas for supporting science teachers in inclusive science teaching.

In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
In: An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education
In: An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education
In: An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education
In: An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education
In: An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education