Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 88 items for :

  • Comparative Religion & Religious Studies x
  • Middle East and Islamic Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
Free access
In: Endowment Studies

Abstract

This is the first of a two-part article that aims at discussing the creation of medical madrasas for Muslims in 7th/13th-century Damascus. This part briefly examines the relationship between medical practitioners and rulers, especially in the Ayyubid period, and studies a number of works written by religious scholars and physicians —often addressed to their patrons—, in which they tackled problems affecting the practice of medicine and its scientific status. I particularly focus on the polemics against pietistic groups who adhered to the doctrine of tawakkul (reliance on God), the emergence of the genre of “prophetic medicine”, and the denunciation of those physicians who impugned the universality of medical principles. This article will provide a wide contextualisation for the discussion of the phenomena that lead to the creation of medical madrasas, which will be analysed in detail in the second part.

In: Endowment Studies

Abstract

The phenomenon of interreligious patronage on the Indian subcontinent in the pre-modern period is best attested in royal inscriptions recording religious endowments. It is striking that most pre-Islamic Indian rulers patronised priests, monks, ascetics, and religious establishments of multiple faiths. The personal religious affiliations of the kings often contrasted remarkably with the patronage patterns followed by them according to the testimony of their epigraphs. The strongest indication for the individual confessions of rulers is given by the religious epithets among their titles. While the ambivalent relationship between the personal beliefs of the kings and their donative practices has been repeatedly described as an expression of Indian religious “tolerance” or of the specific character of Indian religious traditions, this paper emphasises that there were several reasons for the dichotomy. This will be investigated on the basis of the epigraphic material of the Maitraka dynasty, which ruled in Gujarat from the 5th to the 8th centuries. The article also contains an edition and translation of the hitherto unpublished Yodhāvaka Grant of Dharasena iv.

Open Access
In: Endowment Studies
Author: Oskar Böhm

Abstract

This paper traces the fate of Greifswald’s most significant civic foundation: the Peter Warschow Foundation, a foundation that has existed since the Middle Ages to the present day. It examines the reasons why foundations were dissolved or merged at the local level in the GDR and how a civic foundation was able to survive the period of socialism. The empirical basis for this are previously unpublished archival records. The result of the study is that foundation dissolutions and mergers were primarily pragmatically motivated and that the Peter Warschow Foundation was able to survive mainly because of its cultural practice and financial basis.

In: Endowment Studies
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)
In: The Gospel According to Sayyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898)