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In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research
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Abstract

The author has worked in the cattle industry for fifty years. In the 1970’s, cattle handling was terrible and today it has greatly improved. During the last fifteen years, there have been increasing problems with lameness, heat stress, and heart failure in fed beef cattle. These problems slowly increased and people did not notice them until they became really serious. I called this bad becoming normal. The increase is these welfare issues is partially related to increased genetic selection for more muscle and weight gain. Other factors may be muddy pens, a lack of roughage in the ration, heavier cattle at a younger age, or overuse of growth promotants. These practices may overload the animal’s biology and make it dysfunctional. There is a significant minority of producers who push cattle for maximum production, which is detrimental to animal welfare.

Open Access
In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Abstract

Stunning livestock (rendering them unconscious) is a necessary component of initiating humane slaughter, thus it is important to provide support to individuals performing this job. The objective of this study was to identify worker perspectives, training methods, and resources available to workers performing stunning. An online survey was distributed to industry association listservs or direct emails of slaughter plants in the United States of America. An additional survey was administered at an industry conference to increase participation. Twenty respondents completed the slaughter survey. Respondents were commonly trained using an in-person, in-house trainer. Respondents indicated feeling confident in performing stunning after training (18, 90%) and that “stunning animals has become easier the more times they did it” (17, 85%). Only 2 (10%) respondents said there were aware of programs to promote mental health, but most (17, 85%) felt “supported by peers in their workplace.” This preliminary survey identified interest in more training and limited awareness of supportive resources.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Abstract

In Nepal, a predominantly Hindu country, most communities consider the cow as a sacred animal leading to their special place in society. However, male calves are neglected because of their limited utility in the context of religiously restricted beef consumption. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the dairy farmers of the Chitwan district in the central region of Nepal to understand the rearing practices of dairy calves and the associated animal welfare concerns. A majority of the producers (70%) that participated in the survey reared female calves to be replacement dairy animals, hence providing better care and management on the farm. Male calves, however, were vulnerable to indiscriminate removal following non-humane methods; 20% of calves starved by feed withdrawal, and 20% of calves chased away from the farm to live as stray animals. Therefore, the religious, sentimental, economic, and ethical analysis of the welfare situation needs to be assessed in a broader context and a sustainable policy needs to be implemented to change the overall attitude of the farmers towards male dairy calves.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research
In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research
Free access
In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research
In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Abstract

Bernard Rollin’s main concerns are domestic and research animals. Such animals have endured less suffering as a result of Rollin’s seminal work. Animals are of moral concern because they have conscious interests, or telos. Rollin’s use of telos is plausible though more specialized than usual. Rollin has theoretical or in-principle ideals that are unlikely to be accepted as current practice. In result he adopts more moderate moral principles. In the fair-contract, husbandry dimension of agriculture, the farmer takes care of the cows and pigs, recognizing their rights, and then eats them, or sells them to be eaten. He reaches a strange combination of kinship and chasm separating human and animal minds. Rollin’s account of any deeper environmental ethics for a biospheric Earth is unsatisfactory, any respect for life beyond sentience, especially his concepts of global ecosystems.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research
Author:

Abstract

Bernard Rollin taught the first class in veterinary ethics in modern veterinary history at Colorado State University in the late 1970’s as a result of his outrage at the behavior of a CSU surgeon who gave him only one option for his dog, when others were less invasive. The course, which became part of the veterinary curriculum at CSU, began with a history of the evolution of thought and attitudes toward animals from early Greek philosophy and Oriental religion, and followed it to modern times. He used the concept of telos, or nature of an animal, to develop his theory of why animals should be treated as moral objects with rights, and over the period of 40 years taught, wrote books and articles, lectured all over the world, and influenced legislation protecting animals.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research