Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 168 items for :

  • Book History and Cartography x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
Free access
In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo
Author: Dirk Imhof

Abstract

In 1612, Balthasar I and Jan Moretus II, managers of the Antwerp Plantin Press, were able to buy the copperplates and the stock of Ortelius’s atlas in various languages at the auction of Jan Baptist Vrients’s possessions. The two brothers endeavored to sell what they purchased through various means and sold the copies as if they were new editions.

In this article I trace the sale of Ortelius’s Spanish atlas in detail from 1612 to 1641. After an examination of the initial period of occasional sales between 1612 and 1630, I will turn to the unexpected confiscation of some copies of the atlas in Spain in 1630. I will conclude by demystifying the so-called 1641 edition. In this way, the distribution of Ortelius’s Spanish atlas in the first half of the seventeenth century will offer a remarkable overview of the afterlife of this once influential work.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Jan van de Kamp

Abstract

For religious subcultures, the reading of religious books was of great importance, even for Roman Catholics, renowned for their ritual-mindedness and the prevailing limitations in terms of religious reading for laypeople. This article aims to reveal the extent to which the status and role of a subculture affected the printing history and reception of religious books. The Post-Reformation Low Countries – split into the South, where the Catholics were a dominant culture, and the Dutch Republic in the North, where they were a subculture – provides an excellent case study. A very popular meditation book serves as the source for the study, namely Sondaechs Schoole (Sunday school) (1623).

Open Access
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

This article attributes a manuscript in the collection of the KB, the National Library of the Netherlands, to Willem Silvius (c. 1520–1580), an Antwerp printer and a former writing master. The manuscript carries the title Variarum Scripturarum Exempla and contains 44 writing samples in eight different languages. It probably served as Silvius’ personal writing-book, which he used to attract customers when he was working as a writing master in Louvain. In 1562 he intended to publish the manuscript as the first printed exemplar-book in the Low Countries which contained writing models for different languages and settings. Although this publication never materialised, Silvius’ writing-book is a testimonial for the life and the achievements of one of most significant printers of sixteenth century Antwerp.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Monika Barget

Abstract

This chapter focuses on early portraits of American revolutionary leaders that circulated in Europe. The portraits are discussed in the wider context of eighteenth-century visualizations of power and compared with aristocratic portraiture of the time. While depictions of monarchs and princes often reflected Enlightenment ideals, portraits of revolutionaries also drew on existing elite iconography. The chapter argues that, in the course of a transcontinental media exchange, visual concepts of leadership approximated each other and were shared beyond political frontlines. The rise of national identities and active citizenship, for instance, shaped the political iconography of monarchical and republican government systems alike.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery
Author: Ramon Voges

Abstract

In the early 1570s, Frans Hogenberg published his first series of broadsheets covering events of what would come to be known as the Dutch Revolt. Because Hogenberg’s images were widely disseminated when produced, they have been used to account for the nature of the conflict, becoming, in our own times, a part of the collective memory of the revolt. This chapter focuses on how Hogenberg’s first print series represented the beginning of the revolt and raises questions about how his visual reports explained the conflict. It explores the political message the prints conveyed and asks what was being addressed in the eyes of the contemporary audience of these compositions.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery
Author: Malte Griesse

Abstract

The peasant war of 1626 in Upper Austria was one of the three peaks of popular resistance against the Habsburg Counter-Reformation. This chapter focuses on the iconography of the revolt. Practically all printed accounts, both visual and textual, were published beyond the Habsburg territories. Nevertheless, these prints largely shaped the image of a “peasant war.” The chapter also highlights the commemorative iconography that emerged after the violent repression of the uprising, an iconography that countered the government’s policy of damnatio memoriae.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery

Abstract

In the seventeenth century, Hungarian resistance to Habsburg rule fostered considerable media output in the Holy Roman Empire as well as in other regions of Europe. Newspapers, stand-alone pamphlets, and extensive historiographical treatises in multiple languages covered the rise and fall of Hungarian leader Ferenc III Nádasdy and the rebellion of Protestant nobleman Imre Thököly. The chapter analyzes this rich iconography in the context of complex seventeenth-century European alliance systems and aims to shed light on the interplay of government-driven communication and a growing independent news sector.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery

Abstract

The reader interested in how imagery communicated about revolt and revolution in early modern Russia will be sorely disappointed, as no such images were produced there. The visual communication that did take place was contained in the illustrations of foreign travelers’ accounts from the sixteenth century onward. This chapter explores the absence in Russia of indigenously created images of political violence, particularly in broadsheets, and then turns to the few images of political violence that foreigners produced from eyewitness experience. The focus then narrows to a remarkable depiction of judicial punishment that communicated a quite specific message to the European audience about Russia. This was an engraving produced for Adam Olearius’ Travels to Russia and Persia.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery