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Abstract

Accurate information about the number of cats living outdoors and how they respond to different kinds of management are necessary to quell debates about outdoor cat policy. The DC Cat Count will develop the tools and methodologies needed to realize this possibility and make them available for broader use. This three-year initiative represents a major collaboration between animal welfare organizations and wildlife scientists. Its unique and innovative approach is to use the best scientific methods to quantify all subpopulations of cats in the District of Columbia (outdoor, owned, and shelter cats), concurrently test and optimize simpler methods that can be used to measure cat populations by diverse users at scale, and identify the types of interventions that are likely to accomplish desired outcomes most efficiently. Ultimately, we believe that this approach is more likely to improve outcomes for both cats and wildlife than a continuation of the status quo.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Empathy is a psychologically significant phenomenon. It plays a key role in the development of the self, sociality, and prosocial behaviour. The term empathy originated in 19th-century aesthetics, where the concept was seen as an explanation for aesthetic experience. Despite renewed interest in the relation between empathy and aesthetic experiences, investigations into how empathy shapes experiences of art are still scarce. Given this situation, we ask the following three questions: What does one experience when experiencing a work of art empathetically? What is given during such moments? How is consciousness structured in aesthetic empathetic experience? To answer these questions, we analysed five different experiences with visual art using a phenomenological psychological methodology. We found that a complexity of psychologically significant meaning arises from the empathic experience of art. The core aspects of this meaning are captured in a structure incorporating experience of a foreign subjective sense, reliving and affective adherence, interiorisation, pleasure in sharing, and affective understanding. Based on this structure, we argue that aesthetic empathy features a sense of otherness to a degree not previously recognised and that aesthetic empathy is an inherently intersubjective experience in which the spectator is invited to participate and share feelings expressed in the work of art in moments of aesthetic presence.

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

Iraklis Ioannidis (2021) Altruism or the Other as the Essence of Existence: Philosophical Passage to Being Altruistic. Can Ioannidis’s Existential- Phenomenological Passage Reach the Psychology of Altruism and Turn It Toward the Other? Brill, Leiden; Boston, 402 pp. ISBN 978-90-04-44838-4, $166.00 (Hardback)

Iraklis Ioannidis’s new book, though written for philosophers, offers psychologists a much-needed alternative philosophical basis for altruism to the egoistic and individualistic worldview that has long dominated the discipline. Specifically, it provides a phenomenological-existential “passage” to a properly relational understanding of self and other that contrasts with psychology’s atomistic conception of persons and relationships

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology
Free access
In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology
Author: Joseph M. Walsh

Abstract

When I say ‘pain’, it is clearly a singular phenomenon. Yet if I ask for an example, you can provide many varying instances that confound the idea of its singularity. How can a pinprick be of the same thing as depression or grief? This study maintains the singularity of pain by exploring the process and structure of its experience to account for its variance and its subjectivity. Heidegger’s Being and Time provides the pathway to achieving this, where we comprehend how pain’s myriad manifestations, and their inherent subjectivity, relate to our way of Being – the meaningful horizon through which we encounter pain. The study comes to tie the process of encountering pain with a structure that suffering provides, which explains both the variance and the subjectivity of the pain experience. This can then be mapped onto individual experiences of a singular phenomenon to understand how they arose and what has conditioned them.

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

Mufid James Hannush (2021) Markers of Psychosocial Maturation: A Dialectically-Informed Approach. Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 540 pp. ISBN 978-3030743147, $149.99 (Hardback)

I found the term ‘maturity’ irksome for a good portion of my young life; no doubt because I was often referred to as immature. I think what my parents, friends, and partners saw as immature, I saw as a norm-conforming, uptight, even passionless life. In this sense, I can happily say I remain immature. And so, when asked to review the book Markers of Psychosocial Maturation: A Dialectically-Informed Approach by Mufid James Hannush,

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology
Robert McInerney

is a Professor of Psychology at Point Park University. Dr. McInerney’s research focus is on phenomenological perspectives on community as well as critical community psychology. He is on the Education and Communication Committee serving the Housing Advisory Board, Allegheny County, City of Pittsburgh, and a board member for Bridge Outreach in Pittsburgh. In 2017, he received the Carmi Harari Mid-Career Award from APA Division 32 for community outreach work. In 2019, he was awarded the Social Impact Micro Grant from the Center for Inclusive Excellence and the Department of Community Engagement at Point Park

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

Abstract

Depersonalization/derealization disorder (DPDR) is classified as a dissociative disorder in the DSM5. It is noteworthy that the symptoms of depersonalization and derealization are commonly found in many other psychological disorders, including schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while phenomenological features of schizophrenia are commonly found in DPDR. The current study attempts to clarify these apparent similarities via highly detailed phenomenological interviews with four persons diagnosed with DPDR. The data revealed four interrelated facets: 1, Loss of resonance, 2, Detachment from experience, 3, Loss of self, and 4, Commitment to reality. These facets point to a felt loss of immediate and familiar engagement in experience as a basic organizing Gestalt which permeates the various symptoms and signs of our participants with DPDR. Close consideration of this disruption allows their experiences to be more easily distinguished from those of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

Richard Kearney (2021) Touch: Recovering Our Most Vital Sense. Columbia University Press, New York, 202 pp. ISBN: 9780231199520, $75.00 (Hardback), ISBN: 9780231199537 $19.95 (Paperback)

Richard Kearney’s latest book – Touch – is timely, though it was completed before the Coronavirus pandemic. His central contention and conviction is that we are losing touch with touch, with connection and carnal contact, as the virtual replaces the visceral. We are living now at a digital distance with e-banking and online Zoom lectures. We sit in front of screens all day and try unsuccessfully to find

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology

Abstract

Although the importance of the concept of immersion in game studies is indisputable, its meaning remains imprecise and ambiguous. My goal here is to develop a phenomenological clarification of this concept. I begin by clarifying how immersion has been understood in game studies. I further contend that immersion in digital games should be recognized as one modality of immersion among others. This basic realization allows one to open a dialogue between game studies and phenomenology. I develop a phenomenological conception of immersion, which relies on Alfred Schutz’s phenomenology of multiple realities and Theodor Conrad’s phenomenology of immersion. Although such an approach provides us with a general conception of immersion, it does not clarify what specific features characterize immersion in digital games. I argue that this form of immersion is a hybrid phenomenon, which shares certain features with immersion in non-digital games and other features with immersion in other types of digital media. I further demonstrate that immersion in digital games is characterized by a specific function of embodiment. With this in mind, I conclude my analysis by introducing a phenomenologically grounded distinction between actual and virtual embodiment, thereby clarifying in which sense immersion in digital games is an embodied and a disembodied experience.

In: Journal of Phenomenological Psychology