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Abstract

According to Ellen Charry’s critique of modern theology, theology has become too theoretical and intellectual. However, from its beginning, theology has aimed at comforting believers. In that light, this article seeks to recuperate the consolation of theology. In order to do that, it explores how John Calvin and missionaries to Korea of the 20th century defined theology as a source of comfort and used theology to solace the suffering believers.

In: Church History and Religious Culture

Abstract

This article argues that proselytising across the Iberian Atlantic during the early modern period occurred in three historical phases. The first such phase is one of expansion, in which many mass conversion took place without much attention to catechising (1492–1539). The second phase is reforming in nature, as debates on how best to educate the converted in their new faith developed (1540–1579). The third and final phase is homogenising, as the ways in which all the newly converted groups were expected to behave were consolidated around the image of the Old Christin nobility (1580–1640). The sources used in this article include papal bulls, royal decrees, and catechisms, which have been analysed alongside the current historiography.

Open Access
In: Church History and Religious Culture
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Abstract

This article focuses on a specific edition of the Dutch liturgical form for the celebration of the Lord’s Supper. This edition from 1568 contains an extension concerning the words of distribution and the thanksgiving. This modification was done by Dathenus himself. In terms of its origin, this specific edition fits well within the patterns in the genesis of the (Dutch) form for the celebration of the Lord’s Supper itself. The content of the extension includes an invitation, an expansion of the words of distribution, and instruction in the thanksgiving regarding communion with Christ, the eschatological perspective, and living in gratitude. Various motives played a role in this extension, both in terms of the context of its origin and its context of use. This specific text is relevant as it provides more information about the author’s working method, the influence of the London tradition, and a better understanding of later synods and editions of the psalm book.

In: Church History and Religious Culture
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In: Church History and Religious Culture
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Abstract

Self-taught geologist and early convert to Seventh-day Adventism, George McCready Price played a significant, yet largely overlooked role in the rise of the modern creationist movement—and, to some degree, can be seen as the lynchpin leading to mainstream adoption of literal readings of the Christian scriptures. Influenced greatly by the writings of Ellen White, the prophetess of the Adventist movement, Price developed his ideas on flood geology which eventually became a cornerstone of creationist thinking. Price’s commitment to biblical literalism, influenced by White’s visions, shaped his worldview and led him to reconcile his interest in geology with the Adventist model of Earth’s history. His central argument for creationism was based on his belief in a worldwide flood, as described in the biblical narrative, which he saw as having shaped most of the Earth’s geological features. Although Price’s contributions were initially overlooked, his ideas gained prominence through the work of John Whitcomb and Henry Morris, who popularized his concepts in their influential book, The Genesis Flood. Price’s effect on modern creationism highlights the intersection of fundamentalist Christianity, particularly Adventism, with the evolving tension between theology and science in the 20th Century.

Open Access
In: Church History and Religious Culture
In: Church History and Religious Culture