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In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
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Abstract

A Christological reading of the Psalter in which individual psalms are viewed as primarily the prayers of Jesus is evaluated. This recent evangelical tradition of interpretation goes as far as to assert that the Psalms are only secondarily our prayers. However, while the portrait of David the chief psalmist anticipates Jesus Christ as the ideal Davidic king, this does not require that everything in every psalm be applied to Jesus. When David confesses his sins and failings, these words cannot be placed on the lips of Jesus. It remains nonetheless legitimate for believers to make use of the Psalms and apply much of their content to themselves, for, especially in Books IV and V of the Psalter, David sets an example of devotion to God which others are meant to emulate. As well, a Christian rereading of the Psalter sees the God of the psalmist as the Trinity, so that what is said about God can be applied to Jesus Christ.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Author:

Abstract

Christian philosopher Timothy Hsiao has recently provided in this journal a defence of gun ownership and public gun carrying. I will respond with an argument against gun ownership for self-defence. In particular I will argue that Hsiao’s argument misuses Scripture, fails to employ a range of important theological categories, and leads to increased harms. I argue these failings occur because Hsiao’s fundamental objective is not to seek a Kingdom of God theology of guns but rather to defend a libertarian social vision. In effect, his thin theology is really a veneer for a libertarian defence of guns and gun culture, whereas I argue that a Kingdom of God theology seeks to provide a safer society and thus would move society away from gun culture.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Author:

Abstract

The problem of how Paul’s visits to Jerusalem noted in Galatians, line up with Luke’s record in Acts, is well known and the debate over this has been going on for a very long time. After exploring a range of papers on this issue that span a century and a half, this paper briefly introduces the reader to Willis J. Beecher, and summarises his thesis. Beecher proposed that the Galatians 1 visit, is the first visit the converted Paul made to Jerusalem, but it is not recorded in the book of Acts. The Galatians 2 visit is then seen to be the visit Luke records in Acts 9. This unique and creative approach to the two documents demands a rethink of the chronology from Paul’s conversion to the first missionary journey. There are also some new questions that arise because of this alignment and the author grapples with these as well. The article concludes with an appeal: it is time to ignore this theory no longer, but rather we should allow it to be seriously considered when the questions arise concerning the way Galatians and Acts inform our understanding of the converted Paul’s early years of activity.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology
Author:

Abstract

This article highlights the significance of social memory in Christian missions. Memory is a crucial phenomenon that shapes how individuals perceive reality and make decisions. Social memory, in particular, can aid anthropological researchers and Christian missionaries in engaging with people groups. The article summarizes the history of social memory studies and explores the effects of social trauma on group memory. It emphasizes the importance of understanding the context of a target people’s past for the success of the Christian mission. By examining a social group’s history, missionaries can gain insights into how the group is likely to respond to the Gospel message and how they are likely to interpret and apply it in their lives. Overall, comprehending the context is essential for the success of the Christian mission.

In: Evangelical Quarterly: An International Review of Bible and Theology

Abstract

The article examines an unpublished apocryphal prayer against “nezhit” and traces the tradition of its origin in South Slavic medieval literature. The prayer begins “7 angels and 7 archangels walked, 7 candles carried, 7 knives sharpened …”. The “nezhit” disease is, generally speaking, a severe headache, which, according to Christian beliefs, develops into an obscure disease associated with the possession of demonic powers. In the apocryphal prayer, there is a repeated semantic dominance of the number 7, aimed at sacralization and an additional guarantee of success in the battle with diseases, since the number 7 is sacred both in pagan beliefs and in Christianity.

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In: Scrinium
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In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions