Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Book History and Cartography x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

The Spiegel Historiael (1284–1317) is a Middle Dutch translation of Vincent de Beauvais’ Speculum Historiale which was initiated by Jacob van Maerlant and completed by Philip Utenbroeke and Lodewijk van Velthem. The text survives in various manuscripts and fragments, except the Fourth part, started by Maerlant and finished by Velthem, which has only been fragmentarily preserved. Two newly discovered pieces of parchment (Tilburg A and B) at the Regionaal Archief Tilburg were part of an unknown, early fourteenth-century Spiegel Historiael manuscript. Only Tilburg A contains text, i.e. part of the table of rubrics for three books, including the transition between Maerlant’s and Velthem’s work. Its use as binding material has rendered the recto of Tilburg A largely illegible. At the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures in Hamburg, Multispectral Imaging and X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy were applied to Tilburg A, greatly increasing our understanding of the fragment. Palaeographical and codicological analyses showed that the original codex to which the fragments belonged was made between 1315–c.1330. The text is written in a Brabantine dialect. These properties situate the fragments in temporal and geographical proximity to Lodewijk van Velthem. Furthermore, we claim the same decorator was responsible for the penwork in both Tilburg A and the Velthem-owned Lancelot Compilation. This could place the fragments in a wider network of scribes and decorators around Velthem. This article provides the first study of the fragments and an edition of Tilburg A.

Comparisons with both the Spiegel Historiael manuscript at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague as well as a fifteenth-century German prose translation reveal distinctive variants between the latter two texts and Tilburg A.

In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

In this article, we analyse a sammelband of incunabula held at the Diocesan Library of Córdoba, which we believe belonged to William Hewster († 1492), a clergyman and professor at Oxford. It contains six incunabula from Antwerp, Leuven, Paris and Oxford, printed in the workshops of Gerard Leeu (3), John of Westphalia, Antoine Caillaut, and Theodoric Rood & Thomas Hunte. Among the works is the only known copy of Elegantiae terminorum ex Laurentio Valla et aliis collectae, Antwerp: Gerard Leeu, 7.XI.1487 (GW M35200) and the only complete copy of Ars memorativa by Jacobus Publicius [Paris: Antoine Caillaut, 1483–90] (GW M36439).

In: Quaerendo
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848
In: Censorship of Literature in Austria, 1751-1848