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Abstract

A distinct concentration of 150 gallery graves dating to the Late Neolithic (2400–1700 BC) occurs in Göteryd parish in the South Swedish Uplands. This study investigates why such a concentration of gallery graves exists in this region and why these were not exchanged by new monuments in the Bronze Age. In order to discuss these issues, the distribution of the monuments and the stray finds have been analysed and correlated to the results of local pollen analysis. The results support the impression of abandonment at the transition from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. The processes of expansion and abandonment seem to reflect general population trends, as discussed in recent works on population dynamics. Göteryd parish is a highland region and marginal from an agricultural point of view, but it borders on fertile and plain coastal areas, which are easily accessible through river valleys. In periods of population growth, Göteryd parish would absorb people from the coastal plains, a process that probably was reversed when the population shrank. The geographical position of the Göteryd area created a particular dynamic and made it vulnerable to changes in population dynamics, social networks, and climate.

In: Acta Archaeologica
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In: Paragone: Past and Present
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In: Paragone: Past and Present
Author: Sara N. James

Abstract

In 1325, the Opera del Duomo of Orvieto called Master Giovanni di Bonino da Assisi (d. 1347) to fabricate stained-glass windows for their cathedral, the most significant of which would adorn the nearly square Cappella Maggiore, or east-end tribune. In 1334, when Giovanni signed and dated his masterpiece—one of the largest stained-glass windows in Italy—it would have been hailed as a marvel of technology and artistic expression. Although previous scholars have praised Giovanni’s fabrication and painting, they have overlooked the unusual choices of narrative scenes and the arrangement of the forty-four rectangular panes, which alternate both horizontally and vertically to form heretofore unnoticed dual typological relationships between the Marian narratives and the Old Testament prophets. The window not only emphasizes Mary, to whom the founding pope dedicated the cathedral, but also fits into a more comprehensive papal plan than ever before recognized and acknowledges earlier than previously realized devotion to Joseph; heretofore unobserved key episodes in the city’s history, including heresy and a miracle; the probable involvement of theological advisors; and hitherto unseen site-specific dogmatic agendas related to the Feast of Corpus Christi, which was universally sanctioned in Orvieto.

In: Paragone: Past and Present

Editor in Chief Liana De Girolami Cheney is recipient of the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award, President of the Association for Textual Scholarship in Art History (ATSAH), and Visiting Researcher in Art History at the University of Aldo Moro Bari, Italy, and SIALE, University of Coruña, Spain. She is emerita Professor of Art History at UMASS Lowell, USA. Professor Cheney received a BS in Psychology and BA in Philosophy from the University of Miami, Florida, as well as an MA in Art History and Aesthetics

In: Paragone: Past and Present

Abstract

Terra Incognita: Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Life in the Painting of Arturo Rodríguez” focuses on a contemporary Cuban-American artist, whose work engages with the concept of the paragone in his most recent series of paintings. Rodríguez’s Terra Incognita series draws the spectator into works that combine references to literature and to the history of art. Within this continuum, Rodríguez presents imagery drawn from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Hermann Melville’s Moby Dick, and Louis-Fernand Celine’s Journey to the Edge of the Night, juxtaposed with works as diverse as Gustave Courbet’s La Rencontre or Bonjour, Monsieur Courbet (1854) and Japanese Noh masks. The goal of Terra Incognita is to engage the spectator in a journey of discovery and comparison that invites the viewer into a private landscape that juxtaposes art and literature and life as perceived when awake and life as experienced in dreams. Rodríguez does not resolve the implicit paragone he presents in his paintings. He only leads the spectator to the place where it is his audience that decides which is best.

In: Paragone: Past and Present

Abstract

Nineteenth-century American artist Sarah Wyman Whitman continues to gain importance as a designer for book covers and stained glass, and also for her affinity with the American Arts and Crafts movement. Whitman’s works straddle nineteenth-century mass production and nineteenth-century spiritual morality. Grappling with how to align these two seemingly opposing forces informs Whitman’s designs, writings, and artworks. Even though she worked in two industries greatly changed by mass production, stained-glass and book design, her art maintains an appeal to the individual. Her democratic ideals and noble messages imbue her art with a sense of handicraft and virtue. However, her skill in creating economical and innovative book covers and technically superior stained-glass windows demonstrates her understanding of technology. This article argues that Whitman, through a combination of faith and technical savvy, used her art to serve her optimal goal of filling the world with virtue.

In: Paragone: Past and Present
In: When Michelangelo Was Modern