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This article examines the multiform appearance of elemental earth in the 1990s films of Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, including Life and Nothing More, Through the Olive Trees, Taste of Cherry, and The Wind Will Carry Us. Its aim is to consider the elemental aspects of global art cinema, arguing that art cinema treats elements intermedially. Art cinema’s alliance with the elemental has been comparatively overlooked given its associations with the cosmopolitan sites of global modernity, but this essay asserts that modernism is as much geophysical as geopolitical. I read Kiarostami’s films as staging encounters between human action and elemental agency; they set their characters in agonistic relation to the seismic movements and obdurate resistance of the earth. Drawing on elemental philosophy, this article demonstrates that the existential questions regarding life and death in Kiarostami’s filmmaking are oriented toward the earth (as ground, stone, and dust).

In: Studies in World Cinema
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The basis for works by such filmmakers as James Benning and Kevin Jerome Everson, the “Great American Eclipse” of August 2017 demonstrated the desire of artists’ film to capture the unique phenomenon of totality, when the moon completely obscures the sun for a period of several minutes. Beyond the borders of the United States, the transnational efforts of Lukas Marxt’s Double Dawn (2014) in Australia and J.P. Sniadecki’s The Yellow Bank (2010) in China also render the solar eclipse as a phenomenon of great cultural and ecological scope. While the astronomical event in each of these films itself provides a singular and contingent spectacle for the camera, this article argues that the eclipse’s mythical conjugation of the elemental forces of fire and earth also resonates unexpectedly with the diverse environments that fall under the moon’s shadow.

In: Studies in World Cinema
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Abstract

The History of Emotions has been establishing itself as a field of historical research since the 1980s, but, to date, almost no attempt has been made to approach the study of the Spanish and Portuguese inquisitions through the history of emotions. Focusing on the period 1560–1610, which followed the conclusion of the Council of Trent, this essay endeavours to offer a preliminary analysis of Iberian inquisitorial trials for the history of emotions. The first section examines the case study offered by the trial of the Spanish soldier Bartolomé Domínguez, who was prosecuted in Portugal for committing sacrilege in 1589. Having lost all his money gambling, Bartolomé drew his sword and slashed at a wayside cross. This public act of sacrilege led to Bartolomé’s arrest and an investigation by the Inquisition. The surviving inquisitorial trial dossier provides an interesting insight into the role played by emotions in inquisitorial justice and social disciplining in the early modern Iberian Peninsula. The second section examines a limited sample of trials that have been edited and seeks to find references to tears and weeping in such sources. It discusses what such references reveal about the attitudes of inquisitors towards tears within the legal context of inquisitorial trials, and whether tears were always seen as evidence of genuine contrition. The third and final section focuses on investigating how the context of post-Tridentine spirituality might have played a role in the increased attention that the inquisitors paid to other physical signs of contrition beyond tears.

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In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Infinity for Marxists
In: Infinity for Marxists
In: Infinity for Marxists
In: Infinity for Marxists
In: Menge und Krankheit
In: Menge und Krankheit
In: Menge und Krankheit