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Authors: Emily Wertans and Leah Burch

Abstract

This article shares disabled students’ experiences of ableism, discrimination, and exclusion while navigating university life. Drawing upon these experiences, we argue that many of the ordinary systems and assumptions that govern university life often materialise as barriers for disabled students. Introducing the concept of ‘backdoor accessibility,’ this paper examines exclusionary practices and systemic ableism to propose that disabled students are routinely offered a lesser quality service that is argued to be ‘better than nothing.’ In order to navigate these barriers, many students reported the additional expenditure of time, resources and energy. In this article, we explore these barriers and strategies within the framework of affect theory and pay attention to the diverse ways that university life can limit or enhance the affective possibility of disabled students. In conclusion, this article makes some recommendations as suggested by disabled students as potential avenues to overcome disabling structures in higher education.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

Abstract

This paper examines how inherency, established in statements universities produce asserting the core abilities necessary to enter and qualify for their degrees, connects with employment in accredited professions, creating barriers for people with disabilities and related conditions. There is no consistent definition of inherent requirements (ir s) across higher education internationally. To assist the ongoing development of ir s, our discussion is set out across three parts. We start by reviewing the origins of ir s highlighting an inconsistency in form and content across the sector. We then provide an analysis of two ir statements from actual institutions noting how they position disability, ability, and the competencies deemed inherent to teaching and learning. Finally, we examine areas where governance and policy, teaching and learning, and employability, can potentially change how ir s are deployed in future practice. Our goal is to shift academic and work-related requirements beyond inherent possessive limitations to coherent performative prospects.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

Abstract

As a semantic reaction against the miserabilism derived from the economic crisis and social instability of the first half of the nineteenth century, joie de vivre surfaced in France. It denotes enjoyment and the ability to recover from calamitous events. In The Insect (1857) by Jules Michelet, joie de vivre constitutes movement and architectural creation, epitomised in the beehive – ‘the veritable Athens of the Insect World’. Yet the sentiment turns ambiguous in La Joie de vivre (1883) by Émile Zola, for whom it is an attitude required not only to face the contradictions of modernity but also to succeed in the capitalist manipulation of nature through architecture. To explore how the built environment manifests emotional experience, this essay follows the trajectory of joie de vivre, from its appearance as an idiomatic amalgamation to other conceptual variations, including élan vital and jouissance.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author: Cigdem Talu

Abstract

This essay examines urban atmospheres and emotions in the 1898 essay collection London Impressions by British writer, poet and suffragist Alice Meynell. I argue atmospheres are spatialised emotions and investigate the atmospheric dimension of Meynell’s text and her impressions, through a vocabulary of immersion and movement. Within her own manipulation of a ‘visual’ vocabulary, Meynell transforms impressions into atmospheres, the visual into sensorial, moving from the painterly to atmospheric experience, notably through the medium of fog and smoke and other climate indicators. I argue urban atmospheres are the main feature the text brings forth (even through – and perhaps especially because of – the filter of the written word). By probing the application of the history of emotions’ methodologies within architectural and urban history, I argue the concept of ‘atmosphere’ is a productive analytical category to examine visual and textual sources.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society

Abstract

Research on envy across cultures is scarce. Existing studies are predominantly limited to Eurocentric experimental snapshots. As a careful suggestion to diversify methods, samples and theory in envy-related studies, this essay presents a review and an interdisciplinary methodological suggestion to analyse semi-structured interviews of persons with diverse socialisation backgrounds. The essay illustrates that the triggers and objects of envy, its experience, associated expressions and actions, are shaped by socialised emotion norms and feeling rules, emotion socialisation practices, cultural values and social change. The essay concludes that careful qualitative comparisons between different culture socialisation groups in real-life situations and lifeworlds are remarkably absent from interdisciplinary research. This is an epistemological void, considering the significant contributions of ethnography in emotion research.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society