Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,553 items for :

  • Religious Studies x
  • Sociology of Religion x
  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All

Abstract

The unprecedented halt of social gatherings imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic that began in the spring of 2020 highlighted the centrality of ritual participation in the Christian sense of belonging. Offering members of religious communities opportunities and instruments for sustaining their religiosity became a challenge. This time of crisis, adaptation and improvisation thus also shook what it meant to belong to a community of believers.

Based on pre-pandemic in-person observations, interviews and online ethnography in four Christian communities in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, our paper maps how different approaches to ritual practices during the pandemic affected the available repertoires of belonging to Christianity. Upon discussing the relevance of Hervieu-Léger’s vital types of religiosity (the universalist and independent pilgrim and the particularist and interconnected convert) throughout the pandemic, we conclude that the traditional approach to the church as a place of dwelling, as Wuthnow labelled it, was strengthened most.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

Aggrieved religious practitioners often speak to God in public. Their demands of God elicit critical examination not least because they are irreverent and apathetic. The first part of this article explains the importance of hip hop culture to a democratic society through an analysis of Cornel West’s “danceable education”. The second part describes such an education as pious and playful. The next two parts examine how public prayers from a hip hop (part three) and gospel (part four) artist show how questioning God is a socially valuable way to come-of-age. Artists whose vocation is an act of protest against God-forsakenness and poor governance are exemplified in the invocations of those for whom respectability and redemption remain essential. The vocation of invocations in public stress the social value of loss and negation for reasons—maturation and playing—that make public God-talk good for groups that stubbornly need or actively ignore religious practices.

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought

Abstract

Within the scope of global religious history, a Foucauldian genealogical critique makes “history” itself the central focus of inquiry. Genealogy is usually perceived as a methodology for historicizing general concepts within religious studies, which seemingly favours post-nineteenth-century history – something that causes discomfort among pre-colonial researchers. However, this article presents genealogy as a general starting point for any critical historiography across all historical periods, emphasizing its key characteristic as a counter-history originating from the present.

Through a case study, it demonstrates this approach’s practicality by offering a fresh perspective on the notion of an unchanging Sanskrit tradition championed by Hindu nationalists. Genealogical analysis exposes how contemporary research unwittingly reinforces this notion, while the article proposes a counter-narrative using sixteenth to eighteenth-century sources, revealing a dynamic interplay between Sanskrit and Persian scholars under Mughal rule in India. This case underscores the efficacy and adaptability of genealogical critique across all historical periods.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

This article takes part in the current quest for more global histories of religion, yet also reflects on the possible limits of going global. To this end, it engages one specific perspective on religion, namely a sociological one. It probes into Arabic sociologies of religion, especially with reference to Islam. The author argues that epistemically, premises of social contingency may well complement assumptions of absolute truth. However, positions that would subject religion in general to contingency – that is, the idea that religion is constructed by humans rather than ensuing from divine revelation – are largely rejected. This partly explains the rather weak institutionalization of the sociology of religion in Arab countries, but it also recalls that such global institutionalization reflects one particular perspective on religion, which is itself underpinned by normative and epistemic assumptions of the social as absolute.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

This study is a theological reflection on Proverbs 26:24–28 and its relevance to the National Universities Commission’s accreditation exercises in Nigerian universities. Existing literature has not adequately looked into the corruption going on between the nuc and universities in Nigeria. In this study, we extended the literature in this area. The nuc usually earmarks periods to visit universities to appraise their infrastructure and manpower capacity. The aim was to ensure that funding for Nigerian universities was judiciously used. Unfortunately, when nuc officials visit universities, they are bribed into writing down in their reports the pass mark for departments and units that are not qualified to have a pass mark. Also, lectures and departmental heads go as far as borrowing classrooms and offices and putting up tags just to escape the accreditation process. This has greatly added to the sorry state of Nigerian universities. A literary analysis was employed. Recommendations were proffered.

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought

Abstract

This is an originally observed rites of passages in a traditional African context. Through empirical observation and cultural anthropological esoteric engagement, traditions that have been traditionally preserved and kept in the oral or memory have been preserved in the written for the first time. An overview of the Sub-Saharan African context is followed by birthing and naming of the Meru peoples of Kenya. Additional traditions of rites for Meru boys, education, and integration lead to the conclusion.

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought
In: Journal of Black Religious Thought
Author:

Abstract

This article reviews scholarship on Asherah/asherah in light of Ze’ev Meshel’s discovery, including the long held discourses and thoughts on Kuntillet ‘Ajrud and Kibert el-Kom. Grammar takes precedence. A question that seems to have been left out in the current discourse, was Asherah a black goddess?

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought

Abstract

This article begins with social reflexivity and an explanation on an ancient formula that I describe as “Brimme,” an acronym for “build rapport, inform the mind, and move emotions.” Afterwards, the article deals with seminal subject matters in the Book of Philemon. Central are the literary and actualized themes toward the practice of healing, restoration, and community.

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought

Abstract

Imam Muhammad Abdullah (1905–1992) has played a pivotal role shaping the Islamic experience in Fiji and America, two vastly different countries that spanned over six decades. Yet even today, his real historic identity is still shrouded in murky obscurity while his legacy lay mired by layers of confusing myths. This makes him at once fascinating and frustrating. Because Abdullah remains a figure of devotion and a contested site of memory across Islamic movements, it heightens the necessity amongst scholars to disentangle the mythical Abdullah from the historical Abdullah. This essay investigates Abdullah and the Lahore-Ahmadi’s complex entanglements with Wallace Muhammad’s black Muslim community. Their paths were curiously erratic and messy; at times intersecting on a personal, co-conspiratorial level in early 1960s Philadelphia and at other periods they chartered their own separate ways in the mid 1960s after the murderous bloodbaths of Nation of Islam’s religious feuds. From 1970, the pair rekindled their collaboration as their respective organizations became symbiotically intertwined with mixed ramifications.

In: Journal of Black Religious Thought