Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 52,060 items for :

  • Search level: Chapters/Articles x
Clear All
Author: Won Jung Kim

Abstract

We have entered the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which has brought widespread digital transformation with advanced and broadened technologies including artificial intelligence (AI). To help students prosper in a world full of AI applications, it is important for us to offer students sufficient AI-integrated learning opportunities across different subjects, including science. In this position paper, a pedagogical approach to AI-integrated science education through facilitating epistemic discourse is proposed. To establish a foundation for this integration, epistemic similarities and differences between how scientific knowledge is constructed and how AI agents learn are compared, referring to Chinn et al.’s (2014) epistemic cognition framework that attends to epistemic aims, ideals, and processes. Four bins of instructional strategies for facilitating epistemic discourse in AI-integrated science classrooms is suggested, which will help students more readily act as informed knowledge constructors, critics, and users of AI and science, who can pose questions that matter to their lives.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Authors: Faisal and Sonya N. Martin

Abstract

Socio-scientific issues (SSIs)-based instruction is considered a potentially useful pedagogical approach for helping teachers to address the scientific literacy competencies outlined in the national curriculum. However, its effective implementation in the classroom requires teachers to have adequate pedagogical knowledge and skills. In this study, we engaged 45 pre- and in-service biology teachers in an 8-week SSIs teaching-oriented course. The course was designed to provide teachers with theoretical knowledge and practical SSIs teaching experience. Using data collected from the SSIs-based instruction questionnaire, interviews, and course assignments, we explored teachers’ perceptions and attitudes towards SSIs-based instruction. The results of quantitative and qualitative analysis indicated that teachers had a high awareness of some core aspects of SSIs-based instruction and perceived themselves as having sufficient knowledge about SSIs pedagogical aspects. Teachers also demonstrated positive attitudes and perceptions about SSIs-based instruction. However, teachers still recognized the challenges of the SSIs teaching implementation for biology teachers in Indonesian school contexts. Teachers considered factors such as curriculum requirements, teachers’ competency, and students’ characteristics as the SSIs teaching challenges. In addition, teachers expressed concerns about their capacity in managing the SSIs discussion activities.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education
Free access
In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

This study investigates what perspectives younger students considered and how they experienced the complexity of multiple perspectives about autonomous vehicle issues. Over the course of 6 weeks, 28 seventh-grade Korean students participated in role-play and group discussion to understand different perspectives on the issue. We qualitatively analyzed students’ positions toward these issues before and after the class and their perspectives in group decision making. The results indicate that students showed anxiety toward artificial intelligence systems, thus opposing it. They also explained where their concerns about the new technology arose to justify their views and opposition. We also found different patterns when students experienced uneasiness and conflicts in a group decision-making process. The patterns can be classified as (1) exploring multiple perspectives for decision making and (2) experiencing conflicts in working toward group consensus. Implementations for incorporating diverse perspectives into teaching strategies are discussed.

Open Access
In: Asia-Pacific Science Education

Abstract

This book is an introduction to the role played by Spanish formal education in providing feminist pedagogies to adolescents and young people, throughout the first two decades of the 21st century. The images of Spanish feminist protests in recent years, with a considerable presence of young girls but also boys, have spread around the world. But what is their relationship with gender-based inequalities? What is the role of formal education in their understanding of social reality? A sociological and historical analysis of the social and educational changes that have taken place in Spanish youth during these decades are combined, with a pedagogical orientation towards practice.

In: Gender, Youth and Education in Early 21st Century Spain

Abstract

Teaching and learning qualitative research involves engagement with diverse research methods and procedures. In this chapter, we present collage-making as a pedagogical strategy to facilitate doctoral students’ exploration of their research topics. The ideas of arts-based teaching and learning, social constructivism, and knowledge construction through reflection guided our ways of engaging students in social interaction to foster their understanding about research and their own topics of interest. Six first-year doctoral students prepared collages to illustrate their research topics, presented and discussed them with professors and peers and reflected on the processes of creating and thinking about their research with the collages. Through a description of these activities, we demonstrate how collage can be used to explore and recognise student prior knowledge and new understandings, to encourage openness to different perspectives, to unlock new ways of thinking, and to look at the research topic from a different angle. We end the chapter with insights into how collage helped our students become better acquainted with the methodological diversity of qualitative research and make more informed decisions regarding their own research.

In: Engaging Students in Socially Constructed Qualitative Research Pedagogies
Author: Liora Nutov

Abstract

Qualitative research is often a challenging craft for learners. Demands include exploration of beliefs and perceptions of study participants while retaining researcher awareness of his or her own beliefs and perceptions; and construction of a theory or theories of observed reality based on analysis of texts or study of participants’ behaviors. The challenge is even greater for undergraduate students of qualitative inquiry. For some, “research” as a concept poses a psychological barrier, others may not even be aware qualitative research methods exist. A solution that may help qualitative students overcome their personal challenges, preferences and attitudes is a supportive, positive, welcoming, and collaborative classroom climate (in short – CoCC) for learning, created by the instructor.

In this chapter I present my best practices for creating a CoCC. The chapter comprises three sections. First, I present a collaborative classroom climate framework proposed by and characterize the student population at the college in which I teach. In the second section I describe four principles that have guided me in creating supportive, positive and welcoming CoCC. I ground each principle in two earlier qualitative studies – one that presented a teaching framework for qualitative research methods course (QRMC) () and another in which I explored student experiences and the role of the instructor during QRMC (). Using excerpts from student reflections and my own diary I then present exemplar teaching activities and assignments and illustrate the impact they have on students.

In: Engaging Students in Socially Constructed Qualitative Research Pedagogies