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Abstract

Recent years have seen a growing interest in Patristic “angelomorphic pneumatology”, a phrase used mostly to describe early pre-Nicene portrayals of the Holy Spirit. While not denying the existence of such pneumatologies or their shared theological character as observed by scholars of angelomorphic pneumatology, this article seeks to challenge the appropriateness of term “angelomorphic” in a pneumatological context, particularly against the backdrop of its original Christological usage. This study takes as an example Origen of Alexandria, whose pneumatology is not considered “angelomorphic” by the standards of current definitions, but contains certain undeniable features of this angelomorphic theological tradition.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood
In: The Hagiographical Experiment: Developing Discourses of Sainthood