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Between Mobility and Connectivity in the Ancient Mediterranean

Coast-Skirting Travellers in the Southern Levant

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Gil Gambash

Bones, Stones, and Monica

Isola Sacra Revisited

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Laurens E. Tacoma

Coloni et incolae, vingt ans après

Mobilité et identité sociales et juridiques dans le monde romain occid

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Stéphane Benoist

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Jin Li Lim

Abstract

The book concludes by pointing out that by 1960, and despite the PRC’s grand display of solidarity in the repatriation of Indonesian Overseas Chinese refugees, promises that New China had offered to the Overseas Chinese had been broken, and even being Overseas Chinese was a liability. The story of the Overseas Chinese and the PRC through the 1950s reveals that even as the CCP lurched from cynical utilitarianism to radical coercion, even ‘favourable treatment’ neither succeeded in catering to Overseas Chinese interests, nor raise remittance levels. Thus, by the decade’s end, all that had transpired was the payment of a heavy price, for very little in return. This, as the book concludes, places contemporary exhortations by the PRC to the modern-day Chinese diaspora in problematic light, and demands that the historical bases for PRC Overseas Chinese policy be more properly understood.

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Jin Li Lim

Abstract

As this chapter (1956–1957) reveals, despite the party-state’s attempts, it was unable to reconcile Overseas Chinese policy (and ‘favourable treatment) with socialist transformation. Indeed, policies that seemed to create bourgeois—or at least, non-socialist—exemptions were made even more contradictory by Mao’s ‘socialist high tide’ and its drive to intensify and accelerate socialist transformation. Yet, Overseas Chinese policy persisted with ‘favourable treatment’, and it was encouraged in this by the party-state’s turn away from the ‘high tide’. ‘Favourable treatment’ had rationalised privileging as the means to securing Overseas Chinese economic utility, and this rationality combined with a growing sense amongst party-state leaders that Mao’s ‘high tide’ was an irrational path to calamity. Yet, this turn was illusory. In the upheaval of 1957, as Mao leveraged crises abroad (in Hungary) and at home (post-Hundred Flowers) to re-assert his authority, the link between Overseas Chinese policy and anti-‘high tide’ sentiments was a liability in a new Anti-Rightist mood, and Overseas Chinese policy practitioners were forced to repudiate ‘favourable treatment’.

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Jin Li Lim

Abstract

The book begins by detailing Deng Xiaoping’s 1978 attempt to whitewash the history of Overseas Chinese policy, by blaming its failures on the Cultural Revolution, and by claiming that it had been blamelessly benevolent in the 1950s. This contextualises the main questions—and revisionism—of my book, and is the starting point for discussion of my argument, sources, methodology, and the lacunae in CCP orthodoxy and English-language historiography.

Invasions, Deportations, and Repopulation

Mobility and Migration in Thrace, Moesia Inferior, and Dacia in the Third Quarter of the Third Century AD

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Lukas de Blois