In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Sahin Celikten

Abstract

The essay discusses an artist’s view on refugees, having been one himself, working with them, migration, the meaning of identity and tackling boundaries through artworks. The artist finds new ways of communication as an educator by teaching drawing and painting when all other means of communication fail.

Additionally, Celikten combines these topics in his own artwork – which consists of painting and photography – struggling to find out who and where one is; particularly important and essential questions since the refugee crisis in 2015.

Both his work with the refugees and his artwork deal with the topics of nationality, identity and home; Celikten tries to find answers and solace via an artistic output.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
In: Art – Ethics – Education

Abstract

This chapter discusses some of the findings of a research project conducted in two schools in Santiago de Chile between 2015 and 2018. Its main questions were: What are the pedagogical implications of school environments in Chile? And, in what way does artistic creation, as a research methodology applied to the school’s aesthetic environment, facilitate our understanding of the relationship between people and their environment.

Accordingly, the project was inspired by an ethical commitment to listen to ‘vulnerable schools’ (according to Chilean standards) and jointly develop art-based interventions that would allow students, teachers, administrators and families to become managers of their own environment and of the ways in which it becomes part of their educational experience in and through the school. The three-stage methodology consisted in quantitative and qualitative instruments, and art-based interventions. The conclusion affirms the possibility of analysing artistic research as a form of knowledge production through the complex interactions between school communities and their environments.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Dennis Atkinson

Abstract

Foucault reads the term education as educere (not educare) meaning an outstretched hand, leading us toward an outside. But what constitutes this ‘outside’ in art practice, ethics or education? Can we escape the habits and inheritance of the ‘inside, is this even desirable, so as to make practice resonate, respond or be relevant to that which might come to matter on the outside … and who decides what matters? Thus, pedagogic work in holding out a hand and leading outside requires a series of obligations of support for the challenges, leaps and reflections that a learner or a teacher is encouraged to take and make. Though it is important for pedagogical practices to introduce learners to the inheritance of tradition and established forms of knowledge and practice that constitute the known world in order to conceive and produce their own iterations, it is also crucial to view teachers and learners as speculative innovators enabling potentials for a world to come, a world that is not yet known and which cannot, in the didactic sense of prescription, be fully controlled or predicted, nor fully accommodated by established orders.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Brian Hughes

Abstract

This chapter considers how a critical examination of politics can take shape within an undergraduate studio art classroom. A philosophical framework is proposed for supporting student artists who aim to interrogate political issues with their art. The studio is shown to be a space for cross-pollination between diverse academic disciplines, and a space where traditions of art, education, and democracy are interwoven. The creation of multimodal communications that can engage a wider community of citizens in political dialogue is framed as an ambitious aim of art education within a liberal arts context.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Ana Dimke

Abstract

Throughout history, the presence of animals in art demonstrates their importance in human society. Since the 1990s, Human-Animal Studies have become established internationally as an academic discipline, and art educators now face the challenge of having to promote an awareness of animal ethics and animal-friendly action beyond – and through – the depiction of animals. Terms like “animal turn” and “speciesism” describe a pivotal concept, whereby animals are no longer perceived merely as cultural objects or symbols, but rather as individuals and social actors as well as stakeholders. Undoubtedly, this impacts art and contemporary art-pedagogical perspectives.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
In: Art – Ethics – Education
In: Art – Ethics – Education
In: Art – Ethics – Education