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Abstract

While the reasons for the differences in the growth rates of conservative and liberal churches are well studied, one important potential reason for this difference has received little attention. The argument that liberal theology undermines the basis of belief implies that those with liberal theological views may be more likely to lose faith and disaffiliate than those holding conservative theologies that reinforce adherents’ religious faith and practice. Using a nationally representative panel survey of the American public, the analysis performed here shows that those with liberal theologies were significantly more likely to disaffiliate from Christianity, attend church less often, and cease believing in God between the two waves of the survey than those with more conservative theologies. On the basis of these findings, more attention should be given to the role that theology may play in understanding patterns of secularization.

In: Journal of Empirical Theology
In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author:

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of neo-liberalism and neo-conservatism upon American evangelicalism. It does so in the season of climate change. Given the commitment of neo-liberalism to the sovereignty of individual, the notion of government intervention in implementing climate mitigation policies is perceived as an unacceptable violation of freedom. It sits along the ideological challenge of neo-conservatism. Its emphasis on an ‘enduring-moral order’ has inadvertently culminated in ethnocentric anti-globalism, which theoretically conflicts with neo-liberalism’s ideals. These two worldviews are both to be found in expressions of American evangelicalism, however. What might be a biblical-theological response? The argument draws upon the corporate nature of salvific claims, the early church governance in Luke-Acts and finally the social-gospel movement to challenge the association of evangelicalism with the Republican Party. The significance of this critique is due to the way in which this association lies at the heart of climate scepticism.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
In: International Journal of Public Theology
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In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author:

Abstract

This article proposes a public theology of justice in light of police brutality and broad injustice in American policing. That public theology is created through rediscovering the socially and politically transformative nature of the atonement to build a foundation for understanding justice as a proactive, communal, and transformative force. By diagnosing the sickness via historical context and engaging with a plurality of voices, the result is an holistic approach within a framework that catalyzes the conversation forward toward transformative justice.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author:

Abstract

National conservatism is a post-liberal political ideology associated with conferences held by the Edmund Burke Foundation. The intellectual core of this ideology is the use of natural theologies of gender to undergird a transnational and interfaith approach to political theology. This mode of political theology is analyzed in the thinking of political theorist Yoram Hazony, theologian R.R. Reno, philosopher Patrick Deneen, and theologian Albert Mohler. These thinkers do more than simply rejecting the premises of liberal democracy as a political order: they all assert the fundamental role of patriarchal gender roles in the survival and prosperity of the nation state. While they hold that the nation is the primary political unit, their understanding of gender is even more fundamental as a foundation for the nation.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
In: International Journal of Public Theology