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Abstract

The Indian diaspora is a diverse community of migrants who live dispersed around the globe. This includes the situation of Indian emigration to Thailand, which has been ongoing for hundreds of years. Several scholars in Indian Diaspora Studies have previously contributed to an understanding of the different social groups of the heterogenous Indian diaspora in terms of ethnicities, religions, periods of migration, and social and political consciousness. However, Indian Diaspora Studies in Thailand undertaken by Thai scholars over the past decade have only focused on the Siamese Brahmin and the Thai-Indian Sikh and Muslim diaspora in Thailand, and have tended to view Hindu immigrants to Thailand as a homogeneous group. Their contribution is constrained by considering migrants only through the lens of ethnicity, and dualistically conceptualising ethnic boundaries between Indianness and Thainess as a result. This paper, in conversation with previous scholarship, applies the notion of heterogeneity to understand the complexity of the Indian Hindu diaspora in contemporary Thai societies. This article, based on case studies in the Chiang Mai province, asserts that the Thai-Indian Hindu diaspora consists of heterogeneous groups that utilise multi-ethnic-religious identities as cultural strategies to establish their self-identification. Therefore, the Indian Hindu diaspora in Thai society is associated with the (re)formation and recombination of traditional and modern diasporic types of consciousness, reflecting the complexity of the Indian Hindu diaspora in Thailand today.

In: Diaspora Studies
Authors: Doyoun Park and Yongseok Seo

Abstract

This study examines the fundamental causes of intractable conflict and deadlocked negotiation by centering on identity. The cognitive variables of identity are derived, and the causal layered analysis framework is used to analyze the influencing mechanism among cognitive layers. This research assumes that conflicts are influenced by interactions among key variables of the identity frame in the cognitive layer: “ingroup definition,” “outgroup definition,” and “conflict narrative.” The United States–North Korea denuclearization negotiation case is examined using this framework, seeking to understand how these factors influenced the conflict, policy initiatives and negotiations.

In: International Negotiation
Author: Isa Lima Mendes

Abstract

This article discusses the inclusion of Colombian women in the Havana Dialogues with FARC through the theoretical lens of political representation. It chooses representation over the vaguer notion of inclusion to further politicize this debate. Since women’s inclusion is recognized as a major achievement of the process, the article attempts to reframe the discussion by enquiring whether Colombian women were represented in the process, and, if yes, which women and how. It argues that women’s inclusion was possible due to their multilevel articulation and a reluctant and diffuse representative dynamic bringing together female negotiators, the Gender Sub-commission and women’s movements.

In: International Negotiation
Free access
In: Diplomatica
Author: Jim Sykes

Abstract

In this article, I examine the discourse surrounding “listening stations” (surveillance outposts) that the Indian government has built to counter Chinese infrastructural projects in the Indian Ocean. As surveillance technologies are placed on out-of-the-way islands and deep underwater, the ocean is discursively situated in the press and diplomatic circles as a site where the geopolitical and sonic ‘noise’ of the metropole is evaded in virtue of the seeming fidelity of the sea, thus garnering potential for the listening stations to reveal China’s true geopolitical intentions. Drawing on classic securitization theory, as well as writings in the anthropology of security and sound studies, I argue that the positioning of listening stations as sites defined by listening and protection from Chinese encroachment obfuscates how they function as geopolitical speech and an expansion of Indian power. I coin the term “surveillance acoustemology” to refer to the ways that India’s listening stations spatialize India’s projected influence and its ability to hear its Chinese rival across the Indian Ocean.

In: Diplomatica
In: Diplomatica