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This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Free access
In: Acta Archaeologica
Author:

Abstract

In the fifth century BCE, Athenians intensified the worship of non-Athenian and non-Greek deities, a fact which has resulted in massive scholarly attention (Garland 1992; Parker 1996; Neumann 2022). While the legal facet of this procedure has been extensively analysed (Parker 1996; 2011), the spatial aspect of the establishment of new cults – the ‘placemaking’ – has been mainly neglected. This article re-examines the placement of the cults of Asklepios, Bendis and Deloptes, commonly assumed to have been a healing hero and a paredros of Bendis. Based on the iconographical analysis of Piraean votive reliefs for these divinities in combination with the spatial and temporal setting of these attestations, I argue that the Athenians provided space for this first wave of officially accepted religious newcomers close to the Zea harbour. At the temenos, which is usually identified as the Asklepieion and its immediate surroundings, several originally non-Athenian cults were installed during the Peloponnesian War, making it an anchoring point for the divine new arrivals.

In: Acta Archaeologica

Abstract

In this response to the article Archaeology, Language, and the Question of Sámi Ethnogenesis by Asgeir Svestad and Bjørnar Olsen (2023), we correct major misunderstandings made by Svestad and Olsen concerning the methodology of historical linguistics and its relation to archaeology. Our comment concerns the following topics: We explain that there cannot be one ethnogenesis that could be approached by different disciplines because different disciplines are independent and meet only momentarily. We also demonstrate that continuity does not disprove migration, nor vice versa, and explain some methods of linguistic substrate studies that the authors have misunderstood. In Svestad and Olsen’s article, there are also some clearly erroneous statements that we correct in our response. In spite of our critical comments, we genuinely encourage multidisciplinary discussion and cooperation because we share the same research interest: to deepen our understanding of the human past.

In: Acta Archaeologica