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This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
Author:

Abstract

This book examines the connection between ancient Galilean perceptions of space and religious identity by drawing on literary and archaeological evidence from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. My spatial reconstruction in Galilee is informed by the ideas and contributions of spatial theorists, and is divided into three levels of spatial analysis: bodily, communal, and regional.

The first level, bodily space, examines ancient Jewish conceptions of purity, in order to address how religion and ritual were expressed in everyday life in Galilee. These chapters (2 and 3) discuss elements of Galilean material culture which relate to the bodily expression of purity conceptions, and counterpart texts which provide a window into a diverse and complex culture of purity in ancient Judaism. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss communal space, documenting the development of public spaces in Galilee and in ancient Judaism more generally. Communal space as explored in this book concerns purpose-built structures which could facilitate a variety of activities and practices. The third level, regional space, examines how Galilee can be conceived of as a distinct region in the Levant. In particular, I focus on the relations between Galilee and Jerusalem, principally economic and religious ties to the Hasmonean dynasty, which ruled over the southern Levant during the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE. This picks up the discussion of the space of Galilee from the introductory chapter, wherein the textual attestation of Galilee was first discussed.

This book utilises a variety of additional sources that document, and methodologies that have been applied to the study of, Greco-Roman history, archaeology and literature. Furthermore, it uses insights from spatial theory to creatively imagine the spaces that were generated in ancient Galilee. The book considers discussions about identity formation and delineation, especially with respect to how groups are reconstructed through texts and archaeological materials. This volume offers insights towards an understanding of identity and its relation to ancient materials, whilst moving away from essentialist definitions of identity.

In: Galilean Spaces of Identity
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In: IMAGES
In: IMAGES
Author:

Abstract

Immediately after the Holocaust, scores of Jewish survivors created graphic narratives, in word and image, about their individual and collective wartime experiences under Nazi oppression. This essay will make a case for these early postwar works as a “minor art.” “Minor” captures the material characteristics of this low-capital, low-circulation printed matter: slight in weight, small in size, modest in price, and ephemeral in quality. It also describes their “poor” images that pull, in form and structure, from popular culture (comics, cartoons, illustrated books) on the margins of modernist concerns (composite image-texts relying on narrative storytelling). Borrowing from Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of “minor literature” as a deterritorialized, political, collective utterance, I argue that disciplinary notions of “art” and “testimony” have prevented us from seeing this “minor art” and recognizing how its vernacular, amateur art practices allowed survivors to reconstruct the past, remember communities and identities erased, and reclaim their own narratives of persecution. Created by a minority (a decimated Jewish community) working on the peripheries of the art world, they tell a Jewish story using Jewish frames of reference to create a community outside of majoritarian culture. What is at stake in them is not only a poetics of recollection but a politics of representation: of seeing with Jews as a critical act by dominated persons against the dominant, antifascist master narrative of WWII and the primary media of its dissemination, photography and film. Ultimately, this “minor art” can have major implications for both how we understand the crucial first decade of survivor initiatives and how we write our histories of Jewish art.

In: IMAGES