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Abstract

The diaspora has long been regarded as an empowering, egalitarian community, with its internal inequalities largely overlooked. In particular, little is known about how socioeconomic status affects intradiasporic relations. The current study challenges the romanticised perception of the diaspora by shedding light on its internal class disparities. Focusing on the Central Asian diaspora in Russia, the research demonstrates that diaspora elites may be involved in capitalising on the precarity of vulnerable diasporans. More specifically, Central Asian migrant entrepreneurs have been found to weaponise diaspora solidarity to exploit and subjugate migrant workers.

Open Access
In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

This article highlights the key differences between two approaches to Buddhism adopted worldwide, ‘Buddhism(s) for this World’ and ‘Engaged Buddhism.’ Although these two terms seem interchangeable, the article presents some differences arising from specific historical circumstances. While the former originated in a reform movement within Chinese Buddhism at the beginning of the twentieth century, the second one, which emerged later, encompasses a much wider variety of Buddhist movements. While ‘Buddhism(s) for this world’ started as a reformist movement, it has become in some cases the vehicle of nationalism. Meanwhile, ‘Engaged Buddhism,’ a somewhat more diverse movement indirectly inspired by his predecessor, has embraced many social justice causes but struggles to institutionalize. The article presents the geopolitical context of international rivalry in which these two trends seek to affirm their respective perspectives.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

Previous studies suggested that long-term Chinese residents living in Japan, instead of identifying as Japanese or Chinese, may have a “superordinate orientation” not characterized by nationality. This study developed a scale to measure cultural awareness of border crossers and evaluated its reliability and validity. To confirm the scale’s reliability, we conducted two online surveys of adult Chinese who had lived in Japan for at least three years at the time of the survey. A 45-item scale was created based on the interview results. The same items were used in both surveys. An exploratory factor analysis (maximum likelihood method, promax rotation) was performed on the valid responses to the first survey. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on the valid responses to the second survey. The results showed that the Cultural Awareness Scale for Border Crossers has acceptable reliability and validity.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar, renowned as the chief architect of the Indian Constitution and a tireless advocate for social justice, has left an enduring impact on India’s socio-political landscape. This research essay delves into the multifaceted spirit of Ambedkar, emphasizing his profound engagement with Buddhism and the emergence of Neo-Buddhism as a potent catalyst for social transformation. His conversion to Buddhism symbolized a resolute renunciation of the entrenched caste hierarchy, heralding an embrace of the Buddha’s teachings that exalted the fundamental interconnectedness of all sentient beings. This underlines his steadfast belief in Buddhism as an antidote to the deeply ingrained caste system, marking his unwavering dedication to bestow a renewed spiritual identity upon the marginalized. Ambedkar’s profound reinterpretation of Buddhist philosophy, with a focus on its social dimensions and ethical code, exemplifies his spirit of adapting Buddhism to the contemporary struggles of the oppressed.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

The Indian diaspora plays a crucial role in developing strong bilateral synergies between India and the UAE. The collaboration includes remittances, trade, connectivity, tourism, education, health, culture and cuisine, among other things. The quantum of investment and trade cooperation between both countries explains the depth of their relationship. This penetration is linked to the Indian diaspora, which shapes the constituents of meaningful cooperation. The Indian migrant inflow into the UAE started to increase in the 1970s, drawn by the oil economy, coupled with global events such as globalisation and economic liberalisation. The UAE’s political dispensation, albeit conservative, has allowed the diasporic communities the space to pursue their aspirations in myriad fields. The Indian diaspora capitalises on this scope for shared success. Therefore, this paper examines the constituents of bilateralism, the India–UAE partnership and their mutual dependencies, and the role of the Indian diaspora as a significant factor in the bilateral exercise.

In: Diaspora Studies
Free access
In: Hobbes Studies
Author:

Abstract

Jambudvīpa is embedded with and surrounded by perennial water sources from the Great Himalayan hills. The visual remains and literary pieces of evidence show that people in the hoary past were conscious of water sources from the great hills. The Buddha has advised the corporeal use of water in many suttas. Buddhism has vast philosophical dimensions for five elements (water is one of them. It played an essential role in forming the cosmological and corporeal views of hills and water sources. Because of the rising population, monopolization, and monetization of water, a shortage of water is felt in some regions. The paper will examine the Buddhist view on the ecological dimensions of water issues and its engaged traditions.

Open Access
In: Journal of Social Innovation and Knowledge

Abstract

This paper focuses on Indo-Canadian Sikh women’s issues after Covid-19 and their challenges of diasporic consciousness. It is based on a study conducted with face-to-face interviews in Victoria, Canada, to assess these women’s post-Covid-19 challenges in healthcare and employment and their diasporic dual identity crisis. The research addressed questions like: What are the challenges of Indo-Canadian Sikh women in Canada after Covid-19 and the impact of current political affairs? What are women’s integration challenges (perhaps insecurity, discrimination, etc.)? This research is significant for understanding the difficulties of Indo-Canadian Sikh women as a vulnerable group in terms of diasporic dual consciousness, racial discrimination and post-Covid experiences. Discussions on identity incorporate a diasporic theoretical understanding of the dual identity crisis and elaborate on Canadian multicultural policy from a political perspective.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

Women participated in communist movements and contributed to communist culture. At the intersection of women’s history, visual arts, gender studies, history of socialism, and the history of communism, this article focuses on six women photographers—Tina Modotti, Elizaveta Mikulina, Gisèle Freund, Lisette Model, Julia Pirotte, and Gerda Taro—analysing the circulation of their works in the communist press and in circles sympathetic with the communist cause. The research on women photographers’ gazes contributes to a deeper understanding of both the lager networks of communist movement and the multifaceted aesthetics of communist culture. By crossing women’s lives and works, their subjectivity and political paths, the documental and artistic legacy of the images they have produced, the article demonstrates why and how women photographers’ production intersects communist culture during the Comintern and World War ii.

In: Journal of Labor and Society
In: International Journal of Social Imaginaries