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In: Implementation and Replication Studies in Mathematics Education

Abstract

The following paper is an introduction to the image-analytical methods of objective hermeneutics based on an exemplary analysis of a youth-oriented website. In a methodological sketch, the constitutional and fundamental methodological assumptions, procedures and principles are first explained and substantiated. These will then be carried out using the example of an analysis of the MTV website “A Thin Line” in order to illustrate their practical implementation and to enable self-study.

In: Looking beyond Words
Authors: , , and

Abstract

Teacher preparation programs (TPP s) are expected to help preservice teachers (PST s) to be aware of identify and revise their possibly biased perceptions on potential students and schools they may serve. Field experience, a requirement of every accredited TPP, has long been viewed to have an awareness-raising effect to reconstruct experiences into meaningful insights as well as to impact PST s’ perceptions. This study employs photovoice to explore five PST s’ perception on rural students and education during their 5-day field experiences from visiting five rural and ethnic minority schools in Yunnan, a southwest province of China. The findings from this study indicate that PST s in the field far different from their personal education background shift their perspective concern from instruction to student, which could be the sign that PST s improve their reflection to become more inclusive, student-centered other than egocentric, teacher-centered. The study also found that photovoice mediates the participants to document and report their lived experience. It gives the opportunities to PST s to ascribe meanings to the photos representing their knowledge and perspective of the phenomenon. Implication to TPP s is finally discussed.

In: Looking beyond Words
In: Looking beyond Words
Author:

Abstract

How to improve the quality of classroom teaching has become an important issue, and research needs the support of evidence more than ever. Classroom video analysis, an evidence-based research tool, stands out with its distinctive benefits in this regard. The development of classroom video analysis has traveled through approximately four stages (from 1955 to date), each leading to the creation of effective tools and datasets. In the current era of artificial intelligence, recording and analyzing classroom video has evolved from being a cumbersome task to being an accessible and insightful resource. We need to maintain a receptive mindset, constantly exploring a broader spectrum of possibilities presented by the application of video analytics in educational research. The ultimate goal is to leverage these insights to facilitate the high-quality evolution of education.

In: Looking beyond Words

Abstract

Originating in visual anthropology, photo elicitation injects participant-created or curated images into interview processes to generate deeper insights into human experiences. The technique leverages innate cognitive capacities for visual learning, memory, emotion, and meaning-making to elicit vivid narratives from participants interpreting images reflecting their realities. Established theories from visual sociology, psychology, and education substantiate photo elicitation’s benefits over traditional verbal-only interviews. Within education research, photo elicitation holds significant potential for investigating topics where student and teacher lived experiences, identities, relationships, and school cultures are central. Images provide an engaging way to gain nuanced insider perspectives on complex school phenomena compared to conventional interviews or observations. However, photo elicitation also poses challenges requiring careful methodology. Photo elicitation offers an innovative participatory approach embracing visual data to uncover profound qualitative insights, making the method highly suitable for expanding applications in education studies seeking to amplify participant voices.

In: Looking beyond Words
Author:

Abstract

This article offers a review of thirty-one research articles from 2001–2019 on the use of photography as a research method with learners in compulsory education. Understood within the scope of ‘visual’, ‘participatory’ and ‘arts-based’ research methods, many scholars have linked the increased use of the photographic method to greater awareness of the rights of the child and changing understandings of children as full ‘human beings’ with agency rather than simply vulnerable ‘human becomings’. Nevertheless, photography is still a relatively under-utilised approach in research with learners in school-based compulsory education and its use is not widespread globally. Against the background of the history of visual and photographic methods in general and in education in particular, this article highlights two key themes in the empirical research literature: why the photographic method is used (dealing with representation, participation and emancipation); and how the photographic method and the photos themselves are used (pre-generated and participant-generated photographs). It closes with a reflection on what may be holding back its expansion, including key ethical concerns, and a proposal for encouraging its use in education.

In: Looking beyond Words
Author:

Abstract

Professional identity is very important in teaching practice. There is a consensus in the literature that critical reflection can help novice teachers to develop a professional identity. Written form reflective tools such as diaries, reflective papers, and logbooks are conventional instruments for critical reflection among novice teachers. However, written reflective tools have several shortcomings: a) they overly rely on verbal communication; b) there are no standardized guidelines for critical reflection using written-form reflective tools; and c) using written-form reflective tools is an intrapersonal activity. Photovoice has emerged as a new tool for critical reflection in the last few decades. Using photovoice, novice teachers critically reflect through photographs rather than writing. Empirical research has standardized the critical reflective procedure of photovoice. Communities of practice are a signature feature of photovoice. Establishing a community of practice is an effective way for novice teachers to develop a professional identity via interpersonal interaction within a group, sharing their photographs and reflections. Empirical research shows that photovoice enables novice teachers to develop a professional identity. This paper describes the disadvantages of written-form reflective tools and outlines an innovative method of encouraging novice teachers to perform critical reflection.

In: Looking beyond Words
Author:

Abstract

Photovoice is a visual method that has attracted the attention of researchers in the field of education and social sciences in general. However, there are a number of methodological challenges in photovoice research and one of the challenges facing the researchers is the data analysis procedure. This article will propose a strategy for researchers to handle photovoice data analysis. The proposed strategy of photovoice data analysis is consisted of four stages, including a photograph analysis based on the researcher’s interpretations, a photograph analysis based on the participants’ interpretations, a cross-comparison, and theorization. According to the strategy, researchers should analyze both visual data (participants’ voice) and narrative data (interview data) based on their perspectives as well as those of participants in attempt to generate a more credible visual and narrative explanation and theorization of the phenomenon.

In: Looking beyond Words
Author:

Abstract

Participatory visual methods are increasingly used in various disciplines. This article focuses on using photovoice as a methodology, pedagogy and participatory assessment tool in education through Chinese graduate students’ experiences with a photovoice project. The study investigated the efficacy of photovoice as a pedagogical and assessment tool, and the utility of photovoice as a participatory visual research method to examine impacts of globalization on China. A group of sixty Chinese students who studied an Australian transnational Master of Education program participated in this photovoice project. Analysis of the participants’ photographs, narratives, and reflections provided evidence that photovoice can be employed as an effective pedagogical and assessment tool. The findings showed that photovoice related learning was emancipatory and transformative. Photovoice offered opportunities for the participants to deepen understanding and enhance critical consciousness. The study suggests that photovoice as a participatory research methodology has educational and cultural appropriateness for Chinese students.

In: Looking beyond Words