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Abstract

Since the 2000s, various laws have sought to impose Ukrainian in film production. If until 2014, due to decades of Russification, it was not uncommon to see a Ukrainian film shot in Russian, the Ukrainian language has become increasingly dominant in national cinema. The law of 2017 demanding Ukrainian directors to shoot in the official state language has aroused questions and different positions among the film community: while some have tried to resist it, arguing a lack of realism and an artificial use of a standardized Ukrainian language in the context of a predominantly bilingual society, most filmmakers have been able to find creative solutions, by getting in tune with a society that is becoming more and more Ukrainian-speaking, or by resorting to surzhyk, a vernacular mixing Ukrainian and Russian. Apart from Slavic languages, minority languages such as Crimean Tatar have also found their place in contemporary Ukrainian cinema.

In: Studies in World Cinema
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In: Studies in World Cinema
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Abstract

This article examines Alonso Ruizpalacios’ 2018 film Museo with a principal focus on place. It looks at the architectural history of protagonist Juan’s hometown, Ciudad Satélite, and the history of Mexico City’s Museum of Anthropology. What is the historical significance of Ciudad Satélite, which was designed by famed architect Mario Pani? What motivates Juan’s journey across Mexico? In answering these questions, it seeks to address how Museo illustrates Mexican national identity and Juan’s sense of mexicanidad. This study also considers how Museo depicts indigenous culture, spaces, and language in relation to Juan’s crime. The final portion of this article looks at Museo’s commercial distribution data. Using world cinema and festival theory, I consider how Ruizpalacios’ work illuminates the nuanced presence of Mexican cinema in global festivals.

In: Studies in World Cinema
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Abstract

Grounded in Patricia White’s theorization of women’s cinema as world cinema, this article discusses select feature, documentary, and short films of two contemporary Palestinian women filmmakers, Najwa Najjar and Annemarie Jacir. Identifying the transformative and emancipatory processes within Palestinian society and the new Palestinian narratives of return as key elements in their films, this article concentrates on their contribution to the aesthetics and politics of Palestinian cinema. White’s theoretical framework allows for the analysis of the feminist and postcolonial concerns of Palestinian women filmmakers, their engagement with the minor form, and the place of their films within global production and distribution contexts. Taking into account the new responsiveness of Palestinian and global audiences, it also allows for the discussion of their increasingly prominent role in Palestinian cinema and their contribution to the struggle of women filmmakers for better conditions within the film industry.

In: Studies in World Cinema
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Abstract

Preludio 11 is a little discussed Cuban-gdr co-production from the early 1960s that was part of a glut of cinematic collaborations between Cuba and predominantly socialist European partners as a means of skills exchange and relationship-building. However, the film and the fact of the organization of the collaboration can offer valuable insight into the dynamics within the international socialist camp and both Cuba and the gdr’s focus on national projection on the international stage. Through examination of the communication between collaborators – principally between the Cuban and East German cinematic institutes and internal gdr communication – on the film, this article sheds light on the political and symbolic value of Cuba to the gdr and vice versa. It also shows how those relations were in constant flux as the project developed and the two countries battled with their commitment to cultural expression and development and shifting political priorities.

In: Studies in World Cinema
In: Jacob Campo Weyerman’s Comments on the Customs and Manners of his Time
In: Jacob Campo Weyerman’s Comments on the Customs and Manners of his Time
In: Jacob Campo Weyerman’s Comments on the Customs and Manners of his Time
In: Jacob Campo Weyerman’s Comments on the Customs and Manners of his Time
In: Jacob Campo Weyerman’s Comments on the Customs and Manners of his Time