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In: Dersim
In: Dersim
In: Dersim
In: Dersim
In: Dersim
In: Dersim
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Abstract

According to an anecdote in al-Tanūkhī’s Nishwār al-Muḥāḍara, a merchant by the name of Ibn Abī ʿAwf (d.297/910) realized every capitalist’s fantasy: he monopolized the market for olive oil in the Abbasid capital of Baghdad, and manipulated market prices for immense personal profit. By examining a series of related anecdotes, this article poses several questions regarding Baghdadi society: What was Ibn Abī ʿAwf’s background? What was the source of his capital, and what social relations did he develop in order to become a prominent merchant? What financial tools were available to him in his mercantile activity? What social norms governed the pursuit of profit? And what sources can we mine for analyzing such socio-economic norms? We will see that the financial world of third/ninth century Baghdad had a variety of tools for debt financing; that an ambitious merchant needed to maneuver a complex web of relationships in order to succeed; and that contemporary sources reflect an ambivalent attitude — a grudging appreciation but also discomfort — with the pursuit of profit.

In: Journal of Abbasid Studies
Author:

Abstract

This article introduces a hitherto overlooked work on the science of talismans attributed to Jābir b. Ḥayyān, called Kitāb al-Nukhab (The Compendium), but widely known as Kitāb al-Baḥth (The Book of the Quest). The work contains a long and rich text on the natural and metaphysical foundations of the science of talismans, primarily, but also alchemy, and artificial generation. The author explicitly promotes his book as a textbook for learning talismanry that also describes the proper teacher-student relationship needed for this craft. This affords us important insights on the professionalisation of talismanry as science and craft, and a glimpse into how the occult sciences were integrated in the teaching structures of the Abbasid era.

Open Access
In: Journal of Abbasid Studies
Author:

Abstract

This article presents the all-but-lost Armenian inscription ostensibly recording an order from the last years of the Qaraquyunlu ‘Turkmen’ ruler qara Yūsuf (d. 1420 A.D.) at the church of the monastery of Arcowaber, now located in the center of the village of Salmanağa (Erciş, Van) in Turkey. A subsequent article discusses the date of the inscription together with its historical context and function. The present contribution establishes the layout and form of the text, including an extensive commentary of its terminology and content.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

Abstract

Dargāhqolī Khān, also known as Moʿtaman-al-Dawla Moʿtaman-al-Molk Sālār-J̌ang and Khān-e Dawrān Navāb, was a high-ranking Iranian official at the court of the Neżāms of Hyderabad and Awrangābād for several generations, best known for his description of Delhi. He was descended from Khāndānqolī Khān Δolqadr, a member of the Bōrbōr sub-tribe who had joined the line of Torkman chiefs in the region of Mašhad and had migrated to India in 1048 A.H./1638 A.D. The paper presents a brief note on the biography of this prominent Indian politician of Iranian descent.

In: Iran and the Caucasus