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Abstract

This paper focuses on Indo-Canadian Sikh women’s issues after Covid-19 and their challenges of diasporic consciousness. It is based on a study conducted with face-to-face interviews in Victoria, Canada, to assess these women’s post-Covid-19 challenges in healthcare and employment and their diasporic dual identity crisis. The research addressed questions like: What are the challenges of Indo-Canadian Sikh women in Canada after Covid-19 and the impact of current political affairs? What are women’s integration challenges (perhaps insecurity, discrimination, etc.)? This research is significant for understanding the difficulties of Indo-Canadian Sikh women as a vulnerable group in terms of diasporic dual consciousness, racial discrimination and post-Covid experiences. Discussions on identity incorporate a diasporic theoretical understanding of the dual identity crisis and elaborate on Canadian multicultural policy from a political perspective.

In: Diaspora Studies
Free access
In: Asian International Studies Review
Author:

Abstract

This article examines the challenges to international negotiation processes in a world where attempts have been made to create order, but, at present, disorder is on the rise again. Several historical cases are analyzed and compared to detect both positive and negative factors influencing the utility of negotiation processes as an instrument of conflict management and international governance. How has mankind managed to use negotiation as an alternative to warfare? What are the conditions for negotiation effectiveness? What is the utility of negotiation if the context is not ripe for solving problems in a peaceful way? What does history tell us about the ways to deal with interstate wars in the 21st century?

In: International Negotiation

Abstract

Negotiation is the core of diplomacy, and the various elements and aspects of diplomatic practice closely relate to the organization and conduct of negotiations. This article discusses the impact of diplomatic essentials – diplomacy’s basic features stemming from its idea, spirit, culture, traditions, and methods – on negotiating in diplomatic settings. Diplomats need to use these essentials to negotiate effectively. Therefore, in diplomacy, to be a good negotiator, one needs to be a good diplomat. By analyzing the negotiation implications of diplomatic representation, aspiration, groundwork, timing, intercourse, code of conduct, and language, I argue that the essential features of international diplomacy can be seen as important assets of the strategic management of diplomatic negotiation. In other words, diplomatic actors can have a significant impact on negotiation effectiveness by using and managing these seven diplomatic essentials.

In: International Negotiation

Abstract

In 2020, the European Parliament (ep) issued a resolution calling for all European Union (EU) Member States to adopt feminist foreign and security policies, and for a gender-transformative vision in the EU’s own external policy. Drawing on the literatures on negotiations and norm contestation, this article asks why the resolution was so progressive. It also asks how we can characterize and explain the nature of the negotiations leading to the resolution. The findings demonstrate a low level of contestation and negotiations mainly characterized by integrative strategies and solutions. The main opponents to the resolution, the populist radical right groups, were more or less absent from the negotiations but opposed by verbal contestation in plenum and through amendments to the text. We find that individual- and organizational level factors have high explanatory power: the gender equality-friendly institutional culture in the ep was further strengthened by the entrepreneurship of two committed rapporteurs.

Open Access
In: International Negotiation

Summary

On 1 October 2004, a new Royal Netherlands Embassy building opened in Warsaw, Poland. Its striking, contemporary appearance surprises and seduces at the same time: glass, concrete and wood artfully intersect in a sophisticated design that champions transparency and openness. This four-year building project commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs was entrusted to the highly acclaimed Dutch architect Erick van Egeraat (b. 1956). His carefully conceived architectural programme invites a wider discussion on the ways in which embassy architecture can support the aspirations of modern diplomacy. To this end, this article situates the Dutch Embassy building within the wider context of Dutch–Polish diplo-matic relations and examines how its design contributes to defining the practice of Dutch diplomacy. It also proposes a comparative view of trends within Dutch embassy architecture by considering other contemporary ex-amples in South America, Central Europe and Africa.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author:

Abstract

Since 1980, Thailand’s monarchy and military have enjoyed a partnership of power with the latter as a junior affiliate — a highly “monarchized military.” However, after 1992, direct military influence across the country diminished, and after the 2006 and 2014 coups, the military regained enormous clout. The country’s post-2019 facade democracy represents the continuation of a tutelary regime involving palace-endorsed military intervention in politics and apparent electoral governance. However, the armed forces-influenced government faces growing domestic challenges. This study examines Thailand’s military in late 2023. 2023 was profoundly significant because a new civilian government entered office that year, which might challenge monarchy-military primacy. The study chiefly asks: To what extent has the monarchy-military partnership clothed itself under the appearance of democracy (while indirectly interfering in it) to sustain its power, and what are the principal challenges this partnership faces? The study finds that in late 2023, Thailand remained a façade democracy, characterized by electoral authoritarianism and lorded over by monarchy and military — a situation the two institutions preferred to maintain.

In: Asian International Studies Review

Abstract

This study evaluates the effects of the Cambodia Rural Development Program, specifically focusing on income generation and social capital. By employing a difference- in-differences framework and propensity score matching, the study finds a statistically significant positive impact on income, primarily driven by increased engagement in regular income-generating activities. However, the study also finds that the program has a limited effect on village-level collective actions, social cohesion, and perceived safety while inadvertently discouraging financial contributions to community projects. Additionally, trust between villagers and government officials remains unchanged. Heterogeneous analyses reveal the ineffective participation of trauma-experienced subgroups, highlighting the need for tailored approaches in conflict-affected regions.

In: Asian International Studies Review