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Abstract

Rediscovered in 2011 within the collection of the Library of Congress, the Fusheng quantu 福省全圖 (Complete Map of Fuzhou), a delicate nineteenth-century Chinese map, had lain unnoticed for over a century. Its anonymous creator and lack of dating impede a direct tracing of its origins, and it is only known to have arrived through a donation of manuscripts by the American businessman and diplomat Thomas Dunn. The map, with its artistic qualities, provides a window into the seascape of Fuzhou and the Qing dynasty’s coastal defences and maritime strategies. This study transcends the map’s physicality, delving into its associated life histories, including Dunn’s, and the broader context of China’s coerced entry into global trade and diplomacy during the age of high imperialism (c.1850–1900). More than a long-forgotten illustrative account, the map is a piece of evidence that reveals much about the times and places in which it was drawn and viewed.

Open Access
In: Crossroads

Abstract

The Göttingen State and University Library in Germany possesses the only surviving copy of a general map of the Qing empire, which until early 2014 was considered to be lost. The map is a middle-format hand-coloured block print. All the place names and other textual elements in the map are given exclusively in Chinese. The map is authored by a known Chinese scholar, Li Mingche 李明徹 (1751–1832), but is undated. Yet the time of its creation can be reliably approximated to the mid-1820s, most likely 1825–1826. The map exhibits a clear stamp of Western mapmaking, primarily that of French cartography of the eighteenth century, yet its fine fusion with the system of traditional Chinese cartographic conventions and aesthetic preferences makes it an interesting hybrid cartographic specimen. This article proposes an initial analysis of the map providing a basis for future more detailed study.

In: Crossroads
In: International Journal of Social Imaginaries
In: International Journal of Social Imaginaries
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Abstract

This paper elucidates Ricoeur’s use of genetic phenomenology in his analysis of ideology and utopia, and how genetic phenomenology contributes to ideology critique. I argue that Ricoeur’s analysis, examined through the lens of genetic phenomenology, unveils the genesis of the experience of ideology. I propose a model of ideology critique emphasizing the liberation of individuals from ideological delusion without proclaiming an ideology-free position. Additionally, I explore the strategic use of utopian imagination to incite liberating experiences. In conclusion, I underscore the role of social identity constitution as an implicit counterforce to ideology critique.

In: International Journal of Social Imaginaries
Author:

Abstract

The paper is a critical analysis of Max Scheler’s concept of productive phantasy as it functions in two ways that the author finds philosophically interesting. First, it examines critically Scheler’s attempt to overturn the basis for the claims of David Hume that there is no genuine productive phantasy, and that all phantasy is reproductive where it is at all legitimate. Scheler responds with a theory of perception through which he attempts to demonstrate that productive phantasy is an essential component of all perceptual acts. Second, it examines Scheler’s development of the theory of productive phantasy in his late efforts in metaphysics and aesthetics. Here he claims that productive phantasy functions in the Ground of Being in the process of world-creation, with humankind as its helpmate. The result is a genetic phenomenology exhibiting the ways in which the mind comes to constitute a coherent world. The author agrees with Scheler that productive phantasy is indeed essential for the constitution of the everyday world and for the works of art that illuminate that world, but contrary to Scheler, the author argues that Scheler’s claims about the function of the term are incoherent, and it therefore cannot serve as one of the foundations of his “possibly true” metaphysical system.

In: International Journal of Social Imaginaries
In: Shiʿi Materiality Beyond Karbala
In: Shiʿi Materiality Beyond Karbala
In: Shiʿi Materiality Beyond Karbala