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Rosalind E. Hurworth

Over the past two decades there has been a plethora of book for students about how to tackle Qualitative Research (QR), but absolutely nothing on how to teach it! This book attempts to redress the imbalance by presenting a history of what is known about QR teaching, as well as to bring alive current QR teaching and learning through a set of Australian and British case studies. Courses visited were located within a variety of disciplines (including Education, Sociology, Anthropology, Nursing, Psychology, Communications and Evaluation), were taught by both experienced and inexperienced lecturers, were either presented alone or in pairs, took place in a range of institutions. lasted from seven weeks to a year and involved from 15 to over 100 students.
It emerged, however that, no matter what the context, several common issues were raised such as: Should you teach theory, practice or both? How do you determine a curriculum for a QR course? What is the best way to manage student projects? How should students of QR be assessed? In what ways can the constraints of University structures be confronted? and How can lecturer deficiencies in training and experience be overcome? To answer such questions, Professor Hurworth draws deftly from personal observations and rich conversations with both lecturers and students from all the courses described. As a result many practical ideas for moving the teaching and learning of QR forward, are suggested.

Transformative Teaching

Promoting Transformation Through Literature, the Arts, and Jungian Psychology

Darrell Dobson

This is a book that supports teachers, teacher educators and educational researchers as they strive for ways to make their work more authentic, more meaningful, and therefore more spiritual. Dobson describes the practices of exemplary teachers, offers a theoretical framework for transformative teaching, and includes useful examples that the reader can readily include in her own teaching and/or research. Dobson offers two innovative methods of teacher reflectivity (Interacting Narratives and Archetypal Reflectivity) and an original methodology of teaching literature and the arts that draws on the insights of depth psychology. Interwoven throughout the book is Dobson’s own story, that of an ‘at-risk’student who was deeply affected by his high school experiences with drama and literature.
The book will be of interest to teachers in all fields but particularly in literature and the arts. It will appeal to teacher educators, educational researchers, those interested in analytical psychology, those interested in narrative approaches to teacher education, and those interested in narrative approaches to educational research. It will be useful in courses that focus on the construction of teachers’ professional knowledge and reflective practices as well as methodology classes in literature, drama, and all the arts. The book will also be of interest in qualitative, arts-based research methodology classes.

Doing Teacher-Research

A Handbook for Perplexed Practioners

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

There are many teachers who think about doing research in their own classes and schools but who are perplexed by what appears to be involved. This book is intended for these perplexed practitioners, to provide them with an easily understandable narrative about the concrete praxis of doing research in their classrooms or in those of their teacher peers teaching next door or in the same school. The fundamental idea underlying this book is to provide an easily accessible but nevertheless intellectually honest text that allows teachers to increase their agency with respect to better understanding their praxis and the events in their classrooms by means of research.
The author draws on his experience of doing teacher-research while being a high school teacher and department head. Roth uses six concrete research studies that he has conducted alone or with peers to describe the salient parts of any teacher-researcher investigation including: what topic to study; issues of ethics and permissions from students, school, and parents; how and what sources to collect; how to structure resources; how to construct data from the materials; how to derive claims; and how to write a report/research study. Roth chose the case-based approach because cases provide the details necessary for understanding why and how he, as teacher-researcher, has made certain decisions, and what he would do differently today. Using this case-based approach, he allows readers to tie methods choices to situations that they likely are familiar with.

Putting People in the Picture

Visual Methodologies for Social Change

Edited by Naydene de Lange and Jean Stuart

Getting the picture, constructing (and deconstructing) the picture, finding the picture, viewing the picture, being in the picture, changing the pictures—these are all phrases that apply to the fascinating world of ‘putting people in the picture’ in visual research within the Social Sciences. Putting People in the Picture: Visual Methodologies for Social Change focuses on the ways in which researchers, practitioners and activists are using such techniques as photo voice, collaborative video, drawings and other visual and arts-based tools as modes of inquiry, as modes of representation and as modes of disseminating findings in social research. The various chapters address methodological, analytical, interpretive, aesthetic, technical and ethical concerns in using visual methodologies in work with young people, teachers, community health care workers—and even the self-as-researcher. The range of issues addressed in the work is broad, and includes work in the areas of HIV & AIDS, schooling, poverty, gender violence, race, and children’s visions for the future. While the studies are situated within a variety of social contexts, the focus is primarily on work in Southern Africa. The book takes up some of the theoretical and practical challenges offered by Visual Sociology, Image-based Research, Media Studies, Rural Development, and Community-based and Participatory Research, and in so doing offers audiences an array of visual approaches to studying and bringing about social change.

Doing Qualitative Research

Praxis of Method

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

The author takes readers on a journey of a large number of issues in designing actual studies of knowing and learning in the classroom, exploring actual data, and putting readers face to face with problems that he actually or possibly encountered, and what he has done or possibly could have done. The reader subsequently sees the results of data collection in the different analyses provided. The author shows how one writes very different studies using the same data sources but very different theoretical assumptions and analytic technique.
The author brings his publication experience in very different disciplinesinto play to provide readers with way of experiencing research as praxis. The book is organized around six major themes (sections), in the course of which it develops the practical problems an educational researcher might face in a large variety of settings. The book was written to be used by upper undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in research design and professors who want to have a reference on design and methodology.